Iglosuat and sea ice hunting grounds: the contributions of environmental archaeology to the reconstruction of winter cultural landscape of Dog Island, Nunatsiavut

Author(s): Jim Woollett

Year: 2014

Summary

This presentation makes use of environmental archaeology data accumulated in the course of fieldwork in the Dog Island region of Nunatsiavut to reflect on the spatial structure and social dynamics of Inuit winter settlement and land use. Analyses of substantial faunal assemblages recovered from the sites of Oakes Bay 1 (HeCg-08), Koliktalik Island 6 (HdCg-23), Itibliarsuk (HdCg-56) amongst others, permit the detailed reconstruction of seals taken by hunters and consumed by households and, through their life history and palaeodemography, to characterize what types of types of animals were taken and when during the year. Combined with modeling of local sea ice conditions, these data provide means of elucidating tangible changes in subsistence economy and social organization of communities during periods of ongoing environmental transformation, in terms of the strategies of winter seal hunting, location of travel routes and social relations related to hunting.

Cite this Record

Iglosuat and sea ice hunting grounds: the contributions of environmental archaeology to the reconstruction of winter cultural landscape of Dog Island, Nunatsiavut. Jim Woollett. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437211)

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-66,06