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After They Drove Old Dixie Down: Identity and Isolation in a Southwestern Oregon Mountain Refuge

Author(s): Chelsea Rose ; Mark Tveskov

Year: 2014

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Summary

In the spring of 1872 the ‘Carolina Company’ wagon train left the war-torn Appalachian Mountains and headed to Oregon. Pulling up generations’ worth of roots in a region particularly devastated by the infamous Stoneman’s Raid of 1865, the group eventually found refuge on a remote mountain on the Southwest Oregon Coast, where they were given three years to ‘starve out’ by neighboring communities. Described as ‘the bone and sinew’ of the south, the Carolina Company soon established a mill, school, and small ranching settlement that endures to this day. While perceived as backwards by their urban neighbors, the community came to rely on their isolation for survival and sense of identity. At one time promoting itself as a utopian community, the largely self-sustaining colony created a successful, even if modest, existence. Recent investigations have provided new information about this poorly understood historical community and its modern legacy.


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Cite this Record

After They Drove Old Dixie Down: Identity and Isolation in a Southwestern Oregon Mountain Refuge. Chelsea Rose, Mark Tveskov. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437270)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-71,07

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America