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An Examination of Mashantucket Pequot Social Activities and Identity Around the Turn of the Nineteenth-Century Through On-Reservation Ceramic Assemblages

Author(s): John Kelly ; Phillip Mendenhall

Year: 2014

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Summary

Two recently excavated turn of the nineteenth-century Mashantucket Pequot households have offered a glimpse into the Native use of European manufactured ceramics on the reservation in southeastern Connecticut. The Schemitzun Site (72-208) and the 72-226 Site have allowed for a large-sample analysis of a variety of vessel forms and types of varying quality acquired by the Pequot residents of these localities during the colonial era. These Native owned ceramics provide insight into the social activities and daily practices that took place at these households and the strategies their inhabitants utilized to maintain social connections with other indigenous people. They also present an opportunity to evaluate how these material items intersected with Native identity, despite traditionally being considered strictly European identifiers due to their manufacturing origins.


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An Examination of Mashantucket Pequot Social Activities and Identity Around the Turn of the Nineteenth-Century Through On-Reservation Ceramic Assemblages. John Kelly, Phillip Mendenhall. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437275)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): SYM-71,11

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America