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“Coined” in the New World: The Conservation and Importance of Coins from a 1559 Spanish Colonization Shipwreck

Author(s): Jayne Godfrey

Year: 2014

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Summary

From the bottom of Pensacola Bay, where the 1559 Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano colonization fleet now sits, many artifacts have been recovered annually from the University of West Florida’’s maritime field schools. During the 2012 field school, a small disc-shaped concretion was brought up in the dredge spoil and taken to the lab for analysis. Radiographic images indicated that enough metal remained within the concretion for proper conservation methods to be employed. The concretion yielded a 2 Reale coin, which lent itself to further conservation. This poster presents the conservation techniques utilized and the importance of the coin’’s diagnostic features in relation to the Spanish fleet.


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Cite this Record

“Coined” in the New World: The Conservation and Importance of Coins from a 1559 Spanish Colonization Shipwreck. Jayne Godfrey. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437379)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): POS-98,01

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America