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Identifying dog remains from protohistoric and post-contact Inuit archaeological sites in Labrador using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone collagen

Author(s): Peter Whitridge ; Lisa Rankin ; Amelia Fay ; Alison Harris ; Vaughan Grimes

Year: 2014

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Summary

Dogs have been an integral component of Inuit life through their role in hunting and transportation, companionship and as a food resource. Archaeologically, these roles can be investigated through the gross morphological analysis of dog remains, however, the bones of wolves are also found at Inuit archaeological sites and can be similar in size and shape to those of dogs, making an accurate species identification difficult. This poster presents ongoing research using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone collagen to distinguish between domestic (dog) and wild (wolf) canid remains recovered from protohistoric and post-contact Inuit dwellings in Nain, Kongu, Nachvak, and Pigeon Cove, Labrador. These data give insight into the changing nature of the Inuit-dog relationship and may serve as a proxy when comparing Inuit diet, before and after the European colonization of Labrador.


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Identifying dog remains from protohistoric and post-contact Inuit archaeological sites in Labrador using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone collagen. Peter Whitridge, Lisa Rankin, Amelia Fay, Alison Harris, Vaughan Grimes. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 2014 ( tDAR id: 437397)


Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): POS-98,19

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America