Growing the Scorched Ground Green: Confronting the Past and Looking Towards the Future of California’s Ecology

Author(s): Shauna M. Mundt

Year: 2018

Summary

In the last several years the topic of Native American land use and land rights has gained renewed interest in academic, political, and public discourse. This paper explores how late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century Euro-American discourse about the preservation and conservation of nature led to the creation of National Parks at the expense of the indigenous groups who inhabited it. Focusing primarily on California Indians, I examine historical, theoretical, and archaeological data surrounding discourse, myth, displacement, landscape management practices, and cultural capital, as well as what changing government policies and practices—including the use of traditional ecological knowledge—mean for the future of California’s ecology and its vibrant indigenous populations.

Cite this Record

Growing the Scorched Ground Green: Confronting the Past and Looking Towards the Future of California’s Ecology. Shauna M. Mundt. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441133)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 837