Early Sixteenth-Century Shipbuilding in Mexico: Dimensions and Tonnages of the Vessels Designed for Pacific Ocean Navigation

Author(s): Jose L Casaban; Roberto Junco

Year: 2018

Summary

Shortly after the conquest of Mexico, Cortes ordered the construction of a second shipyard on the Pacific coast, known as El Carbón. The new shipyard was located in Tehuantepec (Oaxaca) and shipwrights were brought to Mexico to build and repair the ships for the spice trade with the Moluccas Islands, and even China and Japan. The ships built in this shipyard included San Vicente, San Lázaro, and Santa Agueda which were employed in trade with Peru, and the exploration of the Pacific coast of Mexico and California. These vessels were among the earliest ships built in the Pacific Ocean according to the European shipbuilding tradition. This paper examines the information provided by a document dated to 1535, in which the main dimensions, tonnages, and construction characteristics of three navíos (ships) built in El Carbón – San Lázaro, Santiago, and Santa Agueda – are provided.

Cite this Record

Early Sixteenth-Century Shipbuilding in Mexico: Dimensions and Tonnages of the Vessels Designed for Pacific Ocean Navigation. Jose L Casaban, Roberto Junco. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441160)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
16th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 261