Defending Acapulco. Weaponry from Fort San Diego as archaeological sources for the Port maritime history

Author(s): Josue T. Guzman

Year: 2018

Summary

The Fort of San Diego, at Acapulco, was built and garrisoned since the early 17th-century, in order to repel pirates or naval forces of enemy countries. After the 1776 earthquake, the fortress was entirely redesigned, rebuilt and fitted, according to criteria then in use. This new structure was besieged by an insurgent army, leaded by Morelos during the Mexican Independence War in 1813. The fort was continuously occupied by military personnel until 20th-century, when it became the local prison.

Such a long history as a defensive building is represented by cannons, ordnance ammunition, musket and rifle bullets and flints (for flintlock firearms). The study of these material remains, part of the research agenda of the PAMPA, is a useful resource for the understanding and interpretation of the historical development of the Fort, its garrisons, the port itself and the imperial, transoceanic, global scale system that Acapulco was a part of.

Cite this Record

Defending Acapulco. Weaponry from Fort San Diego as archaeological sources for the Port maritime history. Josue T. Guzman. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441164)

Keywords

General
Acapulco armament. Fort San Diego

Geographic Keywords
Mexico North America

Temporal Keywords
XVI-XIX Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -117.122; min lat: 14.551 ; max long: -86.739; max lat: 32.718 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 328