Patterns of Aspiration, Escapism, and Solidarity on the Transferwares owned by Montpelier’s Enslaved Community

Author(s): Mary Furlong Minkoff

Year: 2018

Summary

Over 50 unique transferprint patterns have been identified among the ceramic vessels recovered from James Madison’s Montpelier. Of these, the greatest variety of patterns are found within enslaved contexts. The variety and abundance of transferwares owned by enslaved people at Montpelier suggests that these pieces were selected for purchase because of their designs, rather than simply their availability or cost. While, decorative arts scholars and collectors, have recognized the use of transferprinted images on ceramic vessels to convey cultural ideas and values of those who made and used them, archaeologists have yet to fully explore the potential of this type of analysis. In this paper, I will examine how enslaved people shared, taught, and expressed their ideas of aspiration, escapism, and solidarity through the cups, plates, and bowls they used every day.   

Cite this Record

Patterns of Aspiration, Escapism, and Solidarity on the Transferwares owned by Montpelier’s Enslaved Community. Mary Furlong Minkoff. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441183)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
18th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 561