Persistent Places in Landscapes of Dispersal: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Investigations at Queen Esther’s Town Preserve, Athens, PA

Summary

We report on research at the Queen Esther’s Town Preserve, an Archaeological Conservancy property in Athens, Pennsylvania. Located at the confluence of the Chemung and Susquehanna Rivers, this land was home to a Delaware community led by Esther Montour during the American Revolution. The town was destroyed in September 1778 as part of the American campaign against British-allied Native villages and has since become a place anchor for the dominant narratives of Native disappearance common in the American Northeast. Before and after Queen Esther’s community resided on these shores, it was a persistent place--attractive to people for its proximity to the major transportation routes and a variety of resources, including cherts, coal, and more recently, artifacts that are dispersed in private and museum collections. We report on our efforts to record and recover archaeological and ethnohistoric evidence to construct new stories for this persistent place in a landscape of dispersal. 

Cite this Record

Persistent Places in Landscapes of Dispersal: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Investigations at Queen Esther’s Town Preserve, Athens, PA. Amber Laubach, Katherine Seeber, Jesse Pagels, Siobhan Hart, Nina Versaggi. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441709)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 682