A False Sense Of Status?: The Ceramic And Glass Wares Of Lower Working Class Irish In The City Of Detroit During Rapid Industrialization

Author(s): Andrew D. McKinney

Year: 2018

Summary

       The immigrant population increased in the City of Detroit between 1840 and 1860 due to rapid industrialization. The Erie Canal and rail-road expansion made Detroit more accessible to the world and was the primary conduit for the influx. The timber and mining industry provided a wide range of employment opportunities. The Irish were the largest group of immigrants. Most of the Irish lived in the Corktown neighborhood. A tenement row-house in the Corktown neighborhood, the Workers Row House (WRH), was built in 1852 and still stands today. Archeologists excavated in the backyard of the WRH from 2006-2008. This poster presents artifact analysis on ceramic and glass wares from the WRH. My research explores whether employment opportunities in a rapidly industrializing city provided the lower working-class Irish with a false sense of financial security which in turn prompted them to purchase ornate wares more closely associated with middle or upper-class society.

Cite this Record

A False Sense Of Status?: The Ceramic And Glass Wares Of Lower Working Class Irish In The City Of Detroit During Rapid Industrialization. Andrew D. McKinney. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441713)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 1051