Remaking Archaeology: Assessing Impacts of Collaborative Indigenous Methodologies on Mohegan Archaeology

Summary

For over twenty years, the Mohegan Archaeological Field School (Mohegan Reservation, Uncasville, CT) has combined indigenous knowledge, sensitivities, interests, and needs with archaeological perspectives. The current iteration of the field school works specifically to bring Mohegan knowledge and archaeology into critical dialogue with academic research and teaching, focusing on the excavation and analysis of archaeological sites from the 18th and early 19th centuries. This poster emphasizes recent efforts to document and ethnographically analyze our collaborative methodologies through video recordings and interviews. These efforts bring together students of diverse backgrounds through the Institute for Field Research, along with archaeologists and members of Tribal Historic Preservation Offices from the Mohegan Tribe and Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. We ask questions about the potentially deep disciplinary impacts of collaborative indigenous archaeology as a mode of inquiry and as a form of community building. 

Cite this Record

Remaking Archaeology: Assessing Impacts of Collaborative Indigenous Methodologies on Mohegan Archaeology. James Quinn, Craig N. Cipolla, Jay Levy, Michael Johnson. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441723)

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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 746