Hawaiian Mormons in the Utah Desert: The Negotiation of Identity at Iosepa

Author(s): Benjamin C. Pykles

Year: 2018

Summary

From 1889 to 1917 Pacific Islander (mostly Hawaiian) converts to Mormonism lived, worked, and worshipped at Iosepa – a remote desert settlement in Utah’s Skull Valley. An examination of the settlement’s design and layout, together with an analysis of petroglyphs at the site, reveal ways this religious community actively negotiated traditional Hawaiian cultural practices and newly adopted Mormon beliefs in shaping and maintaining their unique religious identities – a process that continues among their descendants today.

Cite this Record

Hawaiian Mormons in the Utah Desert: The Negotiation of Identity at Iosepa. Benjamin C. Pykles. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441773)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 740