It's Not an Anomaly: Demonstrating the Principles and Practice of Investigating Adobe Features with Ground-Penetrating Radar

Author(s): Scott Byram; Jun Sunseri

Year: 2018

Summary

Earthen architecture has significant representation in building traditions across large temporal and geographic expanses, so everyone’s people at one time or another dabbled in this technology. Adobe, also known also as dagga, ferey, cob, and other names is a variant in which soil and other materials are formulated into discrete construction components, often in communities of practice for which adobe recipes, preparation, and application are integral to daily intersections of home and community. For archaeologists and our interested publics, a large portion of this architectural culture is no longer visible above the surface, but ground-penetrating radar allows a tantalizing and non-invasive perspective on subsurface adobe features.  Teaching and demonstrating about this perspective can run afoul of the very same limitations from which traditional archaeological field techniques, language, and thinking suffer.

Cite this Record

It's Not an Anomaly: Demonstrating the Principles and Practice of Investigating Adobe Features with Ground-Penetrating Radar. Scott Byram, Jun Sunseri. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441883)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 808