Biology of a Shipwreck: Dendrogyra Cylindrus on the 1724 Guadalupe Underwater Archaeological Preserve

Summary

This is an abstract from the "POSTER Session 2: Linking Historic Documents and Background Research in Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

In June of 2011, Indiana University Underwater Science inaugurated the 1724 Guadalupe Underwater Archaeological Preserve (GUAP) as a Living Museum of the Sea, designed to protect both the submerged cultural and biological resources of the site. Located in Bayahibe, Dominican Republic, the site is an artificial wreck that includes seven cannons and an anchor. Since the placement of the artifacts, the reef extending from the GUAP has continued to grow and flourish. In particular, the coral species Dendrogyra cylindrus, commonly known as pillar coral, appears to be thriving. Designated "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), their presence is a sign of a healthy reef. Fourteen colonies of D. cylindrus were identified and documented in May 2017. Continued documentation and management of the site and extending reef zone is crucial to maintaining and promoting a successful ecosystem.

Cite this Record

Biology of a Shipwreck: Dendrogyra Cylindrus on the 1724 Guadalupe Underwater Archaeological Preserve. Emma DeLillo, Charles D Beeker, Claudia C. Johnson, Samuel I. Haskell. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 449186)

Keywords

General
Biology reef Shipwreck

Geographic Keywords
United States of America

Temporal Keywords
18th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 300