Archaeology and Bioarchaeology of the United States (Legacy 94-0008)

Summary

This project resulted in various studies of archaeology and bioarchaeology throughout the United States.

Cite this Record

Archaeology and Bioarchaeology of the United States (Legacy 94-0008). ( tDAR id: 468040) ; doi:10.48512/XCV8468040

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

URL: https://www.denix.osd.mil/cr/archives/archaeology/index.html


Resources Inside this Project (Viewing 1-3 of 3)

  • Documents (3)

Documents

  1. Archaeology and Bioarchaeology of the Northern Woodlands - Report (Legacy 94-0008) (1997)
    DOCUMENT Full-Text Elizabeth Benchley. Blane Nansel. Clark Dobbs. Susan Thurston Myster. Barbara O'Connell.

    This overview study is intended to provide a summary of what is known about the archaeology of Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota as an aid to CRMs. After reviewing the physical setting, culture history, and bioarchaeology of the region by state, a final integrative chapter proposes a series of adaptation types which crosscut traditional political and temporal boundaries.

  2. Archaeology and Paleoecology of the Central Great Plains - Report (Legacy 94-0008) (1996)
    DOCUMENT Full-Text Mary Adair. Matthew Hill. Jack Hofman. William Johnson. Karolyn Kinsey. William Lees. Brad Logan. Larry Martin. Douglas Owsley. Kyeong Park. Karin Bruwelheide.

    This report provides a summary of the current and past environments of northern Kansas, Nebraska, and northeast Colorado (the Central Great Plains), providing a framework within which to review and discuss changes in prehistoric and historic subsistence economies, technologies, mobility/sedentism, organization, and group interactions. A traditional cultural historical summary is provided for the region from about 20,000 years ago to the historic period.

  3. Archaeology and Paleoecology of the Central Great Plains - Report (Legacy 94-0008) (1996)
    DOCUMENT Full-Text George Grison. Robert Mainfort.

    This report is a review of the 12,000 years of human occupation in the Northwestern Great Plains states of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Synthesis of the archaeological and bioarchaeological resources under the guise of human adaptation types revealed significant gaps that should be addressed by future research.