Isle of Man (Country) (Geographic Keyword)

1-25 (1,033 Records)

The 1839 Parker Academy: On the Frontier of Transformative Resistance and Social Justice (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peggy Brunache. Sharyn Jones.

The Parker Academy, founded in 1839 in southern Ohio, was the first secondary school in the country to house multiracial, coeducational classrooms. Furthermore, several primary sources suggest it was also a participatory component of the Underground Railroad network. This paper highlights our findings of recent excavations and continuing archival research to explore how the school was a site of everyday resistance under a framework of transformative change through education for a multi-racial...


3D Modelling and Interactive Mapping of Historic Shipwreck Sites (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael J Postons.

Recent developments in technology have made the process of recording terrestrial archaeological sites a much more digital affair.  The same can now be said for underwater historical sites such as shipwrecks.  This paper will explore through a number of UK and US projects carried out during 2012, showing how shipwrecks can be mapped and modelled in 3D, the process involved, and the exciting public outreach formats that can be created.  From web based interactive 3D shipwreck tours, to game-engine...


7x105 Dimensions of Pottery: Multivariate Analyses of Pottery Assemblages from the Lower Town Site of Mycenae, Greece (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Tremblay. Daniel E. Ehrlich.

During excavation, it is often safer to record areas separately and later identify associations between strata across a site. Such practice waits until detailed analyses can be conducted and avoids erroneously comparing material from separate depositions. However, the process can lead to more identified strata than are truly present. This project considered relative frequencies of pottery fabrics as a multivariate dataset to characterize and analyze site formation at the Lower Town site of...


The A7 Project - An investigation of HM Submarine A7 (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Holt.

January 2014 was the 100th anniversary of the loss of the Royal Navy submarine A7, sunk during a training exercise off Plymouth, England.  All contemporary salvage attempts failed and the submarine was abandoned on the seabed and forgotten, but the wreck was rediscovered by sports divers in 1981.  In 2001, problems with sports divers removing parts of the submarine prompted the UK Ministry of Defence to designate the site under the Protection of Military Remains Act and all diving was banned. In...


Abandoned Rural Settlements and Landscape Transformations in the Early Modern and Modern Period: Innovative Methodological Approaches of Historical Archaeology within a Central European Context (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lukáš Holata. Michal Preusz.

Settlement and landscape transformations in Central Europe during the Early Modern/Modern period were beyond interest until 1990s and, ironically, remain insufficiently recognised despite better preservation of sites, larger collections of artefacts and broader data sources. Nevertheless, complexity of sites, often with extensive destructions, and a requirement of integration very variable data sources (especially a combination with written evidence and historical maps is significant) generate a...


Acculturation and Its Discontents: Rethinking Models of Interpopulation Interaction during the Middle-Upper Paleolithic Transition (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Julien Riel-Salvatore. Allison Parrish.

Given how large the topic of acculturation looms in discussions of the Middle-Upper Paleolithic transition, it is surprising how little attention has been paid to defining it in order to develop operational concepts that can be tested against the archaeological record. In the specific context of the Middle-Upper Paleolithic transition, the notion of acculturation has usually been considered as a unidirectional, one-size-fits-all social mechanism to explain both the appearance of transitional...


Acts of God? Causation and Agency in Disease History (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Inskip. John Robb.

Epidemics are often understood both by historians and by ancient people as "acts of God" which structure human lives but originate outside systemic causation, and are simply caused by the advent of pathogens. But no simple model of unidirectional causation, whether by natural agents or humans, really does justice to the situation. Disease responds to social and biological environments (for instance, settlement distributions affecting contagion, and poverty and malnutrition compromising the...


Adapting to harsh environment resulting changes in culture that led towards a new perception of the outer world: The birth of the Central European Neolithic (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eszter Bánffy.

In the 6th millennium BC, first farmers reached the area between south east and central Europe, soon spreading into central Europe. About the character and identity of these first farmers at the boundary area, a series of new research results is available. At the boundary, harsh environmental conditions made their long well-working subsistence system unstable, as the ‘package’ of farming and mainly sheep and shifted to cattle keeping. Yet, it has hardly been investigated, what reflections of...


Adaptive Pastoralism and Climate Change in the Irish Chalcolithic – Early Bronze Age: Adding Evidence from Termon, Co. Clare (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Deanna Keegan.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Burren, a karstic region located in Western Ireland, has seen intensive farming practices since the Neolithic. Local proxies throughout the west coast of Ireland have indicated periods where the environment shifted to colder and wetter conditions in two key phases during the late 3rd and early 2nd millennia BC. A comparison of the archaeological record at...


Additional statistical and graphical methods for analyzing artifact orientations and site formation processes from total station proveniences (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shannon McPherron.

The orientations in three dimensions of clasts within a deposit are known to be informative on processes that formed that deposit. In archaeological sites, a portion of the clasts in the deposit are introduced by non-geological processes and these are typically systematically recorded with total stations during excavations. By recording a second point on elongated clasts it is possible to quickly and precisely capture their orientation. The statistical and graphical techniques for analyzing...


Advanced Digital Modelling of the Newport Medieval Ship (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Toby N. Jones. Nigel Nayling. Pat Tanner.

Since its discovery in 2002, the remains of the mid 15th century clinker built Newport Medieval Ship have been excavated, cleaned, documented, modelled and are now midway through PEG and freeze-drying conservation treatment. Digital documentation methods, including laser scanning and contact digitising were used extensively. The manufacture and assembly of a 1:10 scale physical model of the vessel remains has provided both construction sequence information and a suitable foundation from which to...


Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul J Logue.

Historical archaeology in the north of Ireland offers much to the global debate on identity and cultural interaction. There, social order in the post-medieval period has been portrayed as representing a culturally isolated conservative society: a point of contrast with ‘civilised’ Europe. North Irish elites are traditionally believed to have used earth and timber indigenous sites as alternatives to a supposedly more mainstream European architectural lexicon. Recent studies challenge this...


Adventures of the Mountain Hare: An Ancient DNA Study (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra Jamieson. Greger Larson.

This is an abstract from the "HumAnE Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Mountain hares today can be found from Scandinavia to Eastern Russia with isolated populations in Ireland, Scotland and the Alps. While their modern distribution is well understood, the extent of their past range and interactions with humans remains unknown. The primary aim of my research is to assess the natural and human-aided distribution of mountain hares across...


The Afterlife of the Charnel Chapel at Rothwell (Northamptonshire, UK) (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dawn Hadley. Elizabeth Craig-Atkins. Jenny Crangle.

The practice of charnelling human remains has recently been revealed to have been widespread in medieval England, with chapels specially built for this purpose. However, this practice ceased at the time of the early sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation, and the charnel chapels were emptied and in some cases demolished. A rare exception is at Rothwell (Northamptonshire, UK), which survived the Reformation intact, apparently because it was closed up at this time with the charnel in situ. The...


Agrarian Landscapes of coastal Croatia: a view from Nadin-Gradina (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Countryman. Gregory Zaro.

Generalized models of Mediterranean agroecosystems often elide the specific historical and political contexts in which food production necessarily takes place. This paper presents new historical-ecological research currently underway at the multi-period settlement site of Nadin-Gradina near the Adriatic coast of southern Croatia, a typically "Mediterranean" landscape that has hosted a dynamic social-political history of repeated invasion, migration, and colonization by a variety of human actors....


The Agricultural Lexicon of Western Indo-European: Crop Names (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Weiss.

This is an abstract from the "Wheels, Horses, Babies and Bathwaters: Celebrating the Impact of David W. Anthony on the Study of Prehistory" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The first speakers of Indo-European languages who entered Europe brought with them a fairly coherent agro-technological package. This is clear from the significant agreements that can be shown to exist in the lexicon describing the ard and its subparts among the Western...


Agriculture and Resource Procurement for the Castro Settlements of NW Iberia: Examination of Floatation Samples for the Castro Site of Bagunte (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia Neuhoff-Malorzo.

Collection and examination of botanical remains has led to evidence of the development of agriculture in conjunction with the collection or procurement of wild resources at a number of Castro sites across the NW of Portugal and Galicia. Evidence procured to date from a number of such sites stretching from the Galician Region of Spain to the site of Monte Mozinho near the municipality of Penafiel in Portugal covers a span of time from Early Bronze Age to Roman Period and exhibits a combination...


All change down on the allotment: York’s allotment gardens and urban transition (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ross J Wilson.

This paper assesses the development of the allotment gardens in the northern English city of York to demonstrate the processes of urban transition on a scale and on sites which are often overlooked in studies of city life. From the pressures of political reform, social change and environmental concerns, the allotment gardens in the city reflect local, national and international concerns from their origins in the early twentieth century to the present day. Through an assessment of archival...


All in a Day’s Work: The Health and Welfare of Children Living in 19th Century Staffordshire, UK (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kirsty Squires.

This is an abstract from the "The Health and Welfare of Children in the Past" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Children played a key role in coal mining and the pottery industry in 19th century Staffordshire (UK). The number of children that worked in this region during the study period fluctuated between 13% and 33%, and one fifth of the workforce comprised of 5-14 year olds. Long working hours and hazardous conditions had a detrimental effect on...


All in the Family: Using Archeology and Genealogy to Construct a Historical Narrative (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebekah Mills.

Excavations during 2017 for Ballintober Castle in Roscommon, Ireland have uncovered the base of a wall structure and curtain wall for the early fourteenth century castle. As excavations continue to deepen, the structure of the castle reveals a complicated occupational history with cobbled floor occupation levels along with what may be a wall structure appearing underneath this area. The castle excavations can show the Anglo-Norman and Irish ownership of the castle with each owner using different...


(Almost) Making it in the Margins: Medieval Norse Adaptation to the Arctic Fjord Environments (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christian K. Madsen. Jette Arneborg. Ian Simpson. Michael Nielsen. Cameron Turley.

The medieval Norse settlements in Greenland formed the westernmost frontier of Scandinavia, and the Old World, between ca. AD 980-1450. A Norse society of perhaps only some 2500 farmer-hunters settled two subarctic niches: the Eastern Settlement in South Greenland with ca. 550 sites and the smaller Western Settlement 500 km north in the inner parts of the Nuuk fjord region and with only some 90 sites. For still not completely understood reasons, the latter was completely abandoned by AD...


The ambivalence of caves and rockshelters in medieval Norway (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Knut Andreas Bergsvik.

Caves and rockshelters occur frequently in Norway and they were extensively used as dwelling-sites for humans in most periods of the prehistory. During the transition to the medieval period (AD 550 – 1500), however, archaeological excavations show that their use changed significantly. From then on, they mainly served as offering sites, burial sites and as workshops for metal smiths and stone masons. This change may have been related to a change in the perceptions of caves and rockshelters. One...


Analysis Of Artefacts From The Portuguese Nau Esmeralda (1503) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Parham. David L Mearns.

Following the recent discovery and identification of the wreck site of two Portuguese naus from Vasco da Gama’s second voyage to India lost in 1503 off the coast of Al Hallaniyah Island, Oman, a series of scientific analyses were conducted to better understand the origin, manufacture and use of certain types of the recovered artefacts.  The artefacts studied include stone shot, composite lead/iron shot, breech powder chambers, coins and a rare copper-alloy disc that has the appearance of an...


Anarchy in the UK (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lorna J Richardson.

This paper will view British public archaeology through the lens of the specifically British experience of politically energetic and aggressive militant working class sub-cultural phenomenon of punk rock, which asked questions about social issues such as unemployment, racism, sexism, identity and militarism, and the contradictions inherent within a Punk Public Archaeology approach in the UK. It will situate the DIY aesthetic of British Punk Public Archaeology as a cultural expression within a...


Ancient DNA analysis and the Indo-European dispersal (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Anthony.

New methods for analyzing ancient human DNA are introducing a new "molecular archaeology". aDNA permits us to detect mating networks, to see ancestry evolve across generations as populations expanded or died out, to track migrants and their genes across geographic space, and to say whether and with what frequency migrants and the indigenous population mated at the destination. aDNA analysis is an unprecedented tool for the study of ancient migrations, kinship, and biological adaptation. This...