conflict (Other Keyword)

1-25 (38 Records)

Alliances, Coalitions, Hierarchies and Conflict in the Ancestral Pueblo World (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stefani Crabtree. R. Kyle Bocinsky. Timothy A. Kohler.

Using the experimental testbed of the Village Ecodynamics Project’s agent-based simulation "Village," we examine how population growth and resource depletion in the Central Mesa Verde landscape between AD 600 and AD 1280 set the stage for territorial conflict, and how lineage and clan membership likely affected the structure of coalitions. We take a three-pronged approach, combining models for the evolution of leadership, models for the formation of coalitions and alliances, and models for...


America Loses a Star and Stripe. The First Full-Scale Battle of the Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779, the Battle of Brier Creek, Georgia. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Battle.

One of America's bloodiest Revolutionary War Battlefields remained lost and poorly understood until recently. The use of LiDAR mapping and terrain analysis, metal detection, and cadaver dogs, characteristics of a complicated battlefield environ revealed themselves. The Battle of Brier Creek, Screven County, Georgia was the first open land engagement of the British Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779. It was also the first Patriot offensive in the South against an overwhelming British force...


Applications of LiDAR Imagery at the Beech Grove Confederate Camp, Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Mabelitini. Carl R. Shields.

Before any archaeology was conducted at Beech Grove, aerial LiDAR data was acquired, to map known Confederate earthworks, identify earthworks that were not previously known, and otherwise guide the archaeological investigations.  The data sets consisted of 22 LiDAR point cloud LAS swath files which produced high accuracy 3D Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with 1.0 foot cell size. The LiDAR data helped identify at least three Civil War fortification features in the northern and eastern portions of...


Archaeological Investigations of Camp Frazer, Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Mabelitini.

Camp Frazer was established by the Union Army in Cynthiana, Kentucky in September 1861. Built on the farm of Dr. Joel C. Frazer, this post typically garrisoned 900 soldiers. Archival research indicates that a brick structure on the Frazer farm was used by the army as a hospital before being burned by Confederate troops on July 17, 1862. Archaeological investigations located this structure along with numerous military items in situ within the destruction debris. This research sheds light on the...


The Archaeology of Forts and Battlefields (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David R. Starbuck.

Forts and battlefields embody the conflicts between nations.  Victory or defeat in past wars has helped determine the shape of modern society.  This paper discusses some of the most dynamic and exciting archaeological projects ever conducted at sites of military conflict throughout the United States.  Using case studies from all of the major conflicts fought on American soil, this paper discusses how archaeologists use modern scientific techniques to discover the remains of forts, battlefields,...


Archaeology, Ethics and the Remembrance of Conflict on the Island of Ireland (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Audrey J Horning.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Historical Archaeology on the Island of Ireland: New Perspectives" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Conflict characterises much of the history of early modern and modern Ireland, with sites associated with violence common on the landscape. The unresolved political legacies of these events, and by extension the potency of associated sites, translates into their differential treatment. Some locales are...


Bands of brothers: the socio-political and military organisation of Viking armies during the 9th century (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ben Raffield.

During the mid- to late-9th century, historical sources attest to large Viking raiding-fleets and ‘armies’ operating in northwestern Europe. These itinerant groups were not only seeking plunder but also land to settle, and some managed to establish colonies and enclaves with varying long-term success. The size and impact of these groups came under scrutiny during the latter half of the 20th century, when some scholars sought to downplay the influence of warfare as a catalyst of social and...


The 'Bare Branches' of Scandinavian Society and the Origins of Viking Raiding (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ben Raffield. Neil Price. Mark Collard.

The surge of violent raiding that traditionally marks the beginning of the Viking Age at the end of the 8th century ushered in a period of turmoil and change across much of Europe. Though the factors that might have triggered this have been repeatedly debated, no hypothesis has thus far provided a convincing explanation for this important historical phenomenon. One of the oldest arguments, discussed in this paper, was that proposed during the 11th century by Dudo of St. Quentin in Gesta...


The Battlefields Are the Only Thing We Have: Archaeology, Race, and Thanatourism in the Trans-Mississippi South (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carl Drexler.

Archaeology has a long history with the tourism industry. Thanatourism focuses on sites associated with death and violence, such as battlefields, and conflict archaeology can be a powerful means to connect with the public and aid in the development of war-related sites as tourist draws. For American Civil War sites, thanatourism is a potential boon to depressed rural southern economies and a means to improve preservation and interpretation of archeological sites. Archaeologists can have a...


A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Human Remains on the Summit of Tigre Pyramid, El Mirador, Guatemala (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Krummel.

On the platform between the triadic group on the Tigre pyramid at the site of El Mirador, Guatemala, the Mirador Basin Project discovered human remains scattered over the upper platform of this pyramid associated with hundreds of projectile points, in both local chert and obsidian from Central Mexico. Additional artifacts included shell, bone, and large quantities of Early Classic ceramics. This presentation will focus on the osteological remains from this deposit. Skeletal analyses of the...


The Changing Shape of Chickasaw-European Battlefield Narratives (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles R. Cobb. Brad R. Lieb. Benny Wallace.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Historical Memory, Archaeology, And The Social Experience Of Conflict and Battlefields" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In 1541 the first recorded conflict between Chickasaws and invading Europeans led to the expulsion of Hernando de Soto’s army from northeastern Mississippi. Nearly two centuries later, the Chickasaws overwhelmingly defeated two French-led forces that aimed to destroy the Chickasaw Nation....


Citizens Under Arms: Archeological observations on the American Revolution (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Wade Catts. David G. Orr.

Historian Jeremy Black described the War for American Independence as a new kind of war, a transoceanic conflict between a European homeland and its descendants fighting for independence, and one where the concept of citizens under arms played a primary role. Over the last several decades archeologists have investigated the campsites, battlefields, fortifications, and supply points of this conflict. The societies which fielded the armies dictated the character of their military formations,...


Collaboration, collaborators, and conflict: ethics, engagement, and archaeological practice (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Audrey Horning.

Collaboration in contemporary archaeological parlance principally refers to active engagement with one or more selected groups of stakeholders and co-producers of knowledge. But knowledge is always produced for a purpose, and collaboration, or to be a ‘collaborator’ in conflict settings implies an allegiance, often deceitful, to one cause or another. When embedding archaeology in conflict transformation activities, being seen as a ‘collaborator’, or partisan, can actively work against the aims...


Conflict Behind the Lines: Considering Civilians in Conflict Archeology (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carl Carlson-Drexler.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "“We Go to Gain a Little Patch of Ground. That hath in it no profit but the name”: Revolutionary Research in Archaeologies of Conflict" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In challenging the battle-focused perception of Conflict Archeology, we need to consider the deep reach of warfare and social strife to areas away from the front lines. Archeologists have been trying to consider civilian connections to war in...


A Conflict of Values: Bridging the Gap Between Collectors and Professionals (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Barbara A. Clark.

This is an abstract from the "Reflections, Practice, and Ethics in Historical Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The unified ethic has traditionally been used in other fields of study  as a foundation for ethical decision making. The unified ethic makes use of various ethical theories in a process that results in clarity and coherence of the conflict. This paper proposes that the unified ethic can be used to reach a consensus among...


The Decisive Moment in Archaeology: Photography and the Loss, Recovery, and Repatriation of America’s Missing in Action (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jesse W. Stephen.

Henri Cartier-Bresson’s concept of the decisive moment (1952) is one of the most enduring and debated ideas of photography. Defined as when "the visual and psychological elements of people in a real life scene spontaneously and briefly come together in perfect resonance to express the essence of [the] human situation" (Suler 2012, 372), the decisive moment has been explored and practiced extensively in the space of modern photojournalism. Less common is the exploration of the decisive moment in...


Developments in Methodology in Aeronautical Archaeology (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hunter W. Whitehead.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Strides Towards Standard Methodologies in Aeronautical Archaeology" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Aviation cultural materials and landscapes are a budding area of study in both underwater and terrestrial archaeology. Since the 1990s, professional archaeologists have advocated for adequate protection of aviation cultural heritage, and the establishment of a standard methodology and theoretical framework....


Dialogues on the Experience of War: Difficult Heritage (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer F McKinnon. Anne Ticknor. Anna Froula.

War in the Pacific: Difficult Heritage recently engaged veterans, veteran families, and WWII survivors on the Pacific island of Saipan in considering how conflict heritage can be seen as universal to humanity and how it can be used to examine the veteran’s experience. The starting point for this consideration was to focus on the historical and contemporary warrior/veteran’s experiences as it relates to collective human experience of war and how we might come to understand and interpret the...


Empirical honesty and the ethical role of archaeologists in divided societies (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Audrey Horning.

Negotiating the politics of the present while staying true to the evidence of the past is the central challenge of responsible, ethically-engaged archaeological practice: the line between the archaeologist and the citizen is never clear cut. Questions of moral obligation and the imperative to respect multiple perspectives are of particular resonance when dealing with contested histories in conflict-ridden and post-conflict societies. Archaeology in these contexts carries risks, but also the...


Gendering the Post-Conflict City: Memory, Memorialisation and Commemoration in Belfast (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura McAtackney.

Belfast has become synonymous with the study of insidious, civil conflict; especially how ethnic, political and religious divisions are materialized and reproduced in the contemporary city. The impact of focusing on segregation and sectarianism has dominated our understandings of the fractured city leaving the issue of gender sidelined. This paper aims to examine the contemporary city through the lens of competing placemaking strategies: the official implanting of contemporary art and the...


The Impact of War Clubs: An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Conflict (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph Curran. David Raymond. Timothy Curran.

This research focuses on the transformation of conflict from its earliest modes to more intensified forms seen in complex societies. Specifically, the focus is on the transition of combat in band level societies to its institutionalization in tribal social structures. One of the challenges in archaeology is in recognizing steps in the evolution of violence in formative and less stratified societies. To achieve this end, the transition of conflict needs to be operationalized. This investigation...


Interpersonal violence among the prehistoric hunter-gatherers of Cis-Baikal, southern Siberia (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rick Schulting. Angela Lieverse. Vladimir Bazaliiskii. Andrzej Weber.

The large number of mid-Holocene cemeteries from Lake Baikal and its surrounding river valleys provide an unrivalled archaeological resource for the study of northern Eurasian hunter-gatherers. In this paper we present an overview of the skeletal evidence for interpersonal violence, comparing the Early Neolithic (7550–6800 cal BP) and Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age (5700–3700 cal BP), two broad periods exhibiting different mortuary traditions and subsistence practices. Despite the nomenclature,...


Interpreting Communities in Conflict: Utilizing Captain Johann Ewald’s Journal as a Lens to Analyze the Paoli Battlefield (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew A. Kalos.

Upon arriving at Head of Elk, Maryland, General William Howe led his British and Hessian forces on a march through the Mid-Atlantic colonies on a quest to capture Philadelphia.  Hessian jaeger Captain Johann Ewald documented the march, the engagements, and the litany of individuals he encountered during the Philadelphia Campaign.  Utilizing his journal as a unit of analysis, this paper seeks to understand the diversity of individuals and groups that played a role in the Philadelphia Campaign. ...


The memorialisation of ‘excluded’ groups in Washington D.C (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emma L Login.

Growing multiculturalism in many cities has resulted in rising concerns over the shared historical narratives of their inhabitants; particularly in relation to past conflicts. Increasingly groups have spoken out against perceived exclusion from dominant conflict narratives. This paper seeks to understand the ways in which groups exert their claim on past conflicts through the urban environment, specifically through processes of war memorialisation. Examples in Washington D.C. comprise both new...


Narratives of Bravery in Fields of Fire at Wood Lake Battlefield (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sigrid Arnott. David Maki. Franky Jackson.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Historical Memory, Archaeology, And The Social Experience Of Conflict and Battlefields" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The last battle in the Dakota- U.S. war took place near Yellow Medicine, Minnesota in 1862. The dominant narrative, initiated by memorialization events held by U.S. veterans at the site, is of a brave last charge by U.S. soldiers using shoulder arms, under the support of artillery, to...