Social Media (Other Keyword)

1-16 (16 Records)

Ancient Egyptian Curses and Bog Bodies: The Role of Pseudoarchaeology in Tumblr's Subculture (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emma Verstraete.

This is an abstract from the "Interactions with Pseudoarchaeology: Approaches to the Use of Social Media and the Internet for Correcting Misconceptions of Archaeology in Virtual Spaces" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Current digital tools and social media provide a near constant stream of data. While the trustworthiness of this data may be suspect, communication mediums such as internet memes and Tumblr blog posts saturate common search results....


Archaeological Education and Public Outreach through Social Media (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jamie Stott.

With the advent of technology and greater access to public lands, archaeological sites are more vulnerable now than ever before. With photos and site locations being shared across the internet, it is pertinent for us as archaeologists to pierce the veil between academics, professionals, and the general public. Visitation to archaeological sites often results in adverse effects including visitor footpaths, touching or climbing on cultural resources, presence of modern trash, and vandalism to the...


Archaeology in Real-time:  The Use of Social Media as Part of the Excavation of Anderson’s Blacksmith Shop and Public Armoury (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lisa E. Fischer. Meredith M. Poole.

Web 2.0 technologies can provide the public a "behind-the-scenes" look at archaeological excavations, thereby engaging them as the research is happening, not merely after the fact.  Since 2010, archaeological research has been ongoing at Anderson’s Blacksmith Shop and Public Armoury in Williamsburg as part of a project to reconstruct the site.  The archaeological investigations have been featured regularly on both a webcam and reconstruction blog.  The "roving" webcam, which is moved to...


#arrowheads: Instagram as a Creative, Social Media-Based Approach to Public Archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Lynch.

Social media is a hot topic of discussion and innovation among archaeologists. Although we've improved our ability to digitally reach wider audiences, "social media" is not a single entity. Each platform is different: purposes, user bases, and means of connection vary widely. As archaeologists, we must be proactive about fully understanding these differences, in order to find the most effective ways use each platform and reach a greater public. This paper provides an example of one way to...


BOOM BABY!": engaging the public through social media in response to "American Digger (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tonia Deetz Rock. Misti Furr. Kurt Thomas Hunt. Katie Jacobson. Kristina Wyckoff.

In this paper we present our public outreach efforts in response to the American "reality" television series "American Digger," which portrays looting of archaeological resources as a desirable and profitable enterprise at the expense of archaeological context and communal knowledge of our past.  Our efforts included blog posts, the creation and dissemination of a Change.org petition, and the facilitation of involvement and open dialogue through the creation and ongoing administration of a...


The CRM Archaeology Podcast: Podcasting the Profession and Educating the Public (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chris Webster.

Since the first podcasts were available on Apple’s iTunes in June of 2005, podcasting has become a powerful way for anyone to deliver information to the world from the comfort of their home. Podcasts can be informal conversations to expensive productions from major networks. Archaeology podcasting has seen shows come and go and has had a rocky past. The only podcast focused on issues related to CRM Archaeology has been recording since February of 2013 and has tackled everything from ethics on...


Developing Digital Identity and Student Opportunities in a Public Archaeology Degree Program (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kate Ellenberger. Katherine Seeber.

At the beginning of the Masters Program in Public Archaeology (MAPA) at Binghamton University, we worked with the Director to create a digital identity, write a social media strategy, and develop a student blogging group for the program. Student blog posts on contemporary political events and scholarly debates have garnered attention from the archaeological community for the two years since. In this paper, we evaluate the public response to the MAPA blog by analyzing social media posts that link...


The Electric Shield: Stopping Thieves & Turning Hearts with New Technologies (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Donny Knowles.

The Bahamas has a long and storied history of strife and adventure on the high seas, likely longer and richer than anyone knows. Our history is being poached; stolen from the ocean floor and shipped off to auction overseas. These aren’t trophies; they are triumphs and graves, gone and forgotten. Entering nautical archaeology as an outsider has shown me what the average Bahamian can do to expel these thieves from the wealth of our waters, and take back what is ours so we can share it with our...


Exploring Old Avenues in New Ways: Urban Archaeology and Public Outreach in Detroit (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kaitlin Scharra. Krysta Ryzewski. Kate E Korth. Samantha Malette. Mark Jazayeri. C. Lorin Brace.

Over the past year, members of the Unearthing Detroit project at Wayne State University have created digital and public initiatives to increase project outreach.  We presented Detroit archaeology to local schools, invited the public to a special outreach day during our local field school excavation, and provided opportunities to volunteer in the museum and lab.  Our concurrent digital outreach materials include a webpage, a weekly blog, and an interactive social media platform.  The integration...


Guerrilla Foursquare: The appropriation of commercial location-based social networking for archaeological engagement and education (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Dufton. Stu Eve.

One aspect of the emerging field of digital archaeology involves the use of digital geo-technologies to create and disseminate location-based archaeological information to both academic and non-academic audiences. Although archaeological projects often lack the resources or expertise necessary to create tailor-made applications, existing services fulfilling a similar purpose can often be repurposed for archaeological projects. A specific case-study using the foursquare service will help shed...


Making the Inaccessible Accessible: Public Archaeology at a 19th-Century Bathhouse in Alexandria, Virginia (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Catherine M Cartwright.

This paper examines Alexandria Archaeology’s foray into broadcasting archaeological excavations and findings through videos and social media. When excavations began at a well discovered by chance in the basement of a private residence, city archaeologists took a social media approach to reach and educatate the public about a site otherwise be inaccessible to them. Video updates of the excavation posted online allowed followers to witness the process of archaeological discovery and...


Not All Archaeology is Equal: Public Archaeology and the Internet (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lorna J Richardson.

Within Public Archaeology, there has been a critical cultural shift towards awareness of the benefit of public engagement online. A tendency towards 'cyber-Utopianism' would suggest that Internet technologies can foster new dialogue, present community-constructed knowledge, underpin new organisational relationships, whilst redistributing access to cultural resources. Although the democratisation of online communication and production have stretched the boundaries of belonging, critical...


Socially Mediated Terrorism and Conflicting Heritage Values (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Claire Smith.

The confluence of contemporary terrorism and radical changes in the media landscape constitutes a fresh—and currently under-rated—threat to cultural heritage. Socially mediated terrorism in Syria and Iraq is underpinned by a clash in heritage values. As visual symbols of competing political, ideological and religious values, iconic cultural heritage is an increasingly likely choice for extremists seeking visual ways to maximise their impact. Not everyone ascribes to the notion of Outstanding...


Transforming the NPS Digital Experience: Media Outreach to Serve Public Archaeology at Fort Vancouver (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas C. Wilson. Meagan Huff.

National Park Service (NPS) archaeologists and museum professionals must engage the public through media to augment traditional outreach events and programs. Transforming the digital experience is at the heart of the NPS 2016 centennial. The cultural resources program at Fort Vancouver NHS in Vancouver, Washington, engages the public in a variety of archaeology outreach events and works with students in diverse educational contexts. A crucial component of this program is routinely informing the...


When the Small, Local Archaeology Project Goes Global – The Missoula Historic Underground Project (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nikki Manning.

During the fall of 2012 a local, urban archaeological survey project was conducted to see what evidence remained of the Missoula, Montana historic “underground” landscape. Now heading into the fourth year of research and expanding geographically into other cities of the American West, the project which actually began from public inquiries into the existence of a small town underground continues to hold the interest of the local community and beyond. As the project has continued to grow in scope...


Where does your community live? The TrowelBlazers experience. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brenna Hassett. Suzanne Pilaar Birch. Rebecca Wragg Sykes. Victoria Herridge.

The TrowelBlazers project is a community-sourced digital archive of short biographies and images of women whose significant contributions to the fields of archaeology, geology, and paleontology have often been overlooked. Originating in a conversation on Twitter between four early-career researchers, the project began life as a tumblr blog designed to share inspirational images and stories of women researchers in the past. Different social media accounts allow us to interact with a number of...