Chesapeake (Other Keyword)

1-11 (11 Records)

1607 to 1619: An Examination of Change over Time at James Fort (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Danny W. Schmidt. Lisa E. Fischer.

Within the first few weeks of landing on Jamestown Island in the spring of 1607 the colonists set about constructing a triangular palisaded fort. At first tents served to house the colonists, and to shelter their place of worship. Slowly but surely with the first public buildings, the storehouse and the church, more permanent structures began to rise. The interior of the fort would see many changes during these years, both reflected in the documentary record as well as the archaeological record....


A 19th Century Military Landscape in Southern Maryland (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Aaron M. Levinthal.

The Maryland State Highway Administration's recent archaeological investigations in Charles County have helped to increase the understanding of a landscape that directly contributed to events that shaped a developing nation. The discovery and study of several War of 1812 and Civil War sites and loci, all within close proximity of one another, the port town of Benedict, and major waterborne and overland transportation corridors, has provided insights on choices made by 19th century military...


Anglo-Native Interaction in Virginia’s Potomac River Valley (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only D. Brad Hatch.

Trade played a crucial role in the relationships that formed between European colonists and Native Americans during the early colonial period. In the 17th-century Potomac River Valley the interactions between Natives and Europeans laid the foundations for the emergence of a truly creolized society. This paper examines the influence of Native Americans on the early settlement of Virginia's Potomac Valley from 1647-1666 using the Hallowes site (44WM6) as an example. Analyses of the faunal remains,...


The Black and White of It: Rural Tenant and African American Enslaved and Free Worker Life at the Rumsey/Polk Tenant/Prehistoric site (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ilene B. Grossman-Bailey. Michael J. Gall. Adam Heinrich. Philip A. Hayden.

Rich and provocative data on 1740s to 1850s tenant occupations were revealed by Phase II and III archaeological investigations at Locus 1 of the Rumsey/Polk Tenant/Prehistoric site.  Documentary research, the recovery of 42,996 historic artifacts, and the discovery of 622 features, provided a rare glimpse into the lives of free and enslaved African American workers and white tenants living side-by-side in the racially charged atmosphere of 18th- and 19th-century Delaware. Artifacts like wolf...


Exploring The Architecture Of "My Lord’s Gift": An Analysis Of A Ca. 1658 - Ca.1750 Archaeological Site In Queen Anne, County, Maryland (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Henry M Miller. Jay Custer.

An archaeological rescue project in 1990 on the "My Lord’s Gift" site (18QU30) in Queen Anne, County, Maryland revealed a fascinating complex of colonial structures.  This tract was granted by Lord Baltimore in 1658 to Henry Coursey, an Irish immigrant and important official in the colony’s government.    Excavators found a variety of architecture represented at the site.  The largest building they uncovered was the substantial cobble stone foundation of an unusual T-Plan house with a massive...


Marley Brown: The View From Maryland (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Julia King.

When I first met Marley Brown, I thought, what a character. Some thirty years later, Marley is still a character who has made major contributions to Chesapeake historical archaeology. During his tenure as director of CW’s department of archaeological research, Marley expanded the program’s focus to include sites along the James and York rivers, building a spatial and temporal context that has served all of us working in the region, including those of us in Maryland. Marley’s refreshing...


"Pushing Against a Stone": Landscape, Generational Breadth, and Community-Oriented Archaeological Approaches in the Plantation Chesapeake (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jason Boroughs.

By the antebellum era enslaved communities across large tidewater Chesapeake plantations boasted deep temporal and broadly dispersed roots, enjoining residents across quarters through bonds of kinship and camaraderie that often transcended plantation boundaries.  Broad cross-plantation neighborhoods encompassed mosaics of significant places suffused with notions of community and grounded in generational investments in labor and experience, places and ties that often retain value to present-day...


Reimagining Methods in Historical Zooarchaeology: Getting to the Meat of the Matter-Identifying Butchery Goals and Reconstructing Meat Cuts from Eighteenth Century Colonial Virginia (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dessa E. Lightfoot.

Faunal remains from archaeological sites are only the byproduct of meals, discarded after the meat has been stripped from them.  A detailed butchery analysis is one way of thinking of bones as vehicles for meat, making it possible to link what was removed for consumption with what is found archaeologically.  Seeking to reconstruct meat cuts is another way to get at not just what species or how much people were eating, but how that meat was conceived of, prepared, and served.  Butchery analysis...


Remember the Ladies: Women Scientific Gardeners (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Pruitt.

In the history and archaeology of early Chesapeake gardens, there is an absence of the ladies. This paper seeks to reframe the discussion of "scientific gardening" to address the ways that assumptions about gender in the present can skew the presence of women in the past. It was not uncommon for the ladies of the house to be in control of the greenhouse and kitchen gardens of plantations. Despite this commonly female involvement in the cultivation and experimentation of plants, scientific...


The Role of Landscape in Power Dynamics of the Past: An Example from Eighteenth-Century Piedmont Virginia (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Crystal L. Ptacek.

The neighborhood surrounding historic Indian Camp plantation located in Virginia’s eastern piedmont helps provide an interpretation about past identity formation and power dynamics. Using public records and ArcGIS, I locate this historical community to explore networks in which these individuals were involved. Historic land patents surrounding the Indian Camp property were given a spatial quality, and based on resulting maps, research has identified a dynamic community. Through the 1720s and...


To Scuttle and Run: The Institute of Maritime History’s Search for Lord Dunmore’s Floating City of 1776 (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David P. Howe. P. Brendan Burke.

Since 2008 the Institute for Maritime History (IMH) has supported a research project at the confluence of the St. Marys and Potomac rivers. This area is the suspected locus of Lord Dunmore’s scuttled fleet from 1776. As the last British colonial governor of Virginia, Dunmore fled the colony with a flotilla of loyalists, soldiers, and sailors. Aboard the civilian fleet, guarded by Royal Navy sloops and a frigate, Dunmore unsuccessfully attempted to restore order to an unravelling colony. After...