Identity/Ethnicity (Other Keyword)

1-25 (88 Records)

Across the Lake: Interregional Connections with the Tiwanaku Occupation of Copacabana (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara L. Juengst. David Hansen. Sergio Chavez. Stanislava Chavez.

Tiwanaku, the first expansive state in the southern Andes, established colonies in many parts of the Andes (Moquegua, the Atacama Desert, Cochabamba) and exerted influence over the southern Titicaca basin. Archaeologists have recreated daily life for people living in these places, producing many insightful studies of Tiwanaku diet, cultural bodily modifications, disease, and occasional incidents of trauma. Many colonists living far from the Tiwanaku heartland developed hybrid lifestyles,...


Aging and Funerary Practices at Monte Alban, Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Soraya Alencar.

In the past decades, new theoretical and methodological developments in bioarchaeology and archaeology of death have allowed the exploration of age categories that are very challenging to access archaeologically: infants and older adults. Although Mesoamerican archaeology has largely used evidence for representations of aging in different sources of information (textual and iconographic) to engage in a broader consideration of funerary practices, approaches of old age as an identity category has...


Ancient DNA Analysis of Orton Quarry (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paige Plattner. Meradeth Snow.

This is an abstract from the "Ancient DNA in Service of Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Orton Quarry site is a Late Prehistoric ossuary along the coast of Lake Erie in Pennsylvania. In March 1991, heavy-equipment operators accidentally destroyed a majority of the site before archeologists arrived. Since the excavation very little had been published on the Orton Quarry site, it’s importance or its original inhabitants. One of the...


Archaeological Identifiers of Cultural Affiliation: The Case of the Middle Horizon(?) Site of Sonay, Peru (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Malpass.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The site of Sonay in the Camana Valley of southern coastal Peru was originally identified as a Wari-affiliated site, based on the close architectural similarities of its major structure to other Wari imperial sites. The two original radiocarbon dates from below the structure suggested an occupation at the very end of the Middle Horizon, long after it is...


Archaeological Use of Meta-analyses to Limit Researcher Bias: Results from El Coyote, Honduras (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Rogoff.

There is extensive evidence that people are self-serving in the interpretation of data and are very likely to reach their desired conclusions. This paper describes the use of meta-analyses for combating researcher bias in archaeological and the results of my research at El Coyote, a Classic Period center in western Honduras.


Athapaskans on the Plains: A Glimpse of Dismal River Lithic Technology (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Delaney Cooley.

This is an abstract from the "New and Ongoing Research on the North American Plains and Rocky Mountains" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Recent interest in early Athapaskan population movements has led to the reconsideration of Dismal River sites on the Central Plains during the mid-16th to 18th centuries. Although most archaeologists recognize Dismal River people as ancestral Apache, an unclear archaeological record and outdated evidence has led...


Baubles, Bangles and Beads: The Role of Personal Adornments in a 17th Century Spanish Mission Period Community (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard Jefferies. Christopher Moore.

More than a decade of archaeological investigations at Mission San Joseph de Sapala and its associated Guale village of Sapala on Sapelo Island, Georgia have provided significant new insights into the nature of Spanish-Guale interaction and negotiation. Some of these cultural transactions are reflected by items of clothing or personal adornment that were worn by the Spanish and/or Native Americans who lived in that 17th century Spanish Mission community. This poster explores the nature of...


Becoming Cypriot: Identity Formation, Negotiation and Renegotiation on Bronze Age Cyprus (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Osterholtz.

This is an abstract from the "Pushing the Envelope, Chasing Stone Age Sailors and Early Agriculture: Papers in Honor of the Career of Alan H. Simmons" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Work on Cypriot identity has a long history, beginning with the identification of the first Cypriots during the Neolithic. This presentation continues on in the direction begun by Alan Simmons at Ais Giorkis of examining physical remains to understand what it meant to...


Behind the Walls: LIP Architecture and Settlement Organization across the Peruvian Titicaca Basin (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Arkush.

This is an abstract from the "Beyond the Round House: Spatial Logic and Settlement Organization across the Late Andean Highlands" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. At hilltop sites in the Titicaca basin, the good architectural preservation of house foundations, patios, walkways, tombs, and dividing walls offers a glimpse of the organization and day-to-day functioning of LIP communities. These architectural choices potentially had implications for the...


Being Matlatzinca: Ethnicity and Household Activity at Aztec Calixtlahuaca (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Angela Huster.

In written sources, the Mexica provide stereotyped descriptions of other groups, many of whom had been conquered and incorporated into the Aztec Empire. I use data from the site of Calixtlahuaca to evaluate the archaeological validity of such stereotypical practices for one group, the Matlatzinca. In particular, I focus on the heavy reliance on maguey, and locally distinctive foodways relating to maize. I then consider whether these practices became more or less pronounced once the area came...


Betwixt and Between: Negotiating Hispanic Identity from Past to Present (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Atherton.

This is an abstract from the "Chicanx Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Research on Hispanic-descent communities in the American West appears to be betwixt and between discussions of indigeneity and nation-building, and for good reason. Drawing on historical and archaeological research of Spanish colonial land grants from the northern and middle Rio Grande, this paper examines some of the ways "Spanish" settlers navigated the tumultuous...


A Bioarchaeological Approach to the Social Construction of Community Identities in Mountain Landscapes (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara Marsteller.

This is an abstract from the "Living and Dying in Mountain and Highland Landscapes" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Huarochirí Manuscript has made legendary the social relationships of pre-Columbian groups inhabiting the Andean mountain landscape that ascends steeply from the present-day coastal capital city of Lima, Peru, to the high-altitude Huarochirí Province. In this famous collection of ethnohistoric narratives, authored in the indigenous...


Bioarchaeology and Genome Justice: What Are the Implications for Indigenous Peoples? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebecca Tsosie.

This is an abstract from the "Social Justice in Native North American Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper examines the theme of "discovery," used in relation to Indigenous lands and peoples to designate the respective claims of Indigenous peoples and the European peoples that colonized North America. In particular, I look at the domain of "bioarchaeology" and the construct of "genome justice" to explore how DNA science attempts...


The Body at the Washtub: A Bioarchaeological Reconstruction of Identity from a Purported 1849ers Oregon Trails Burial at Camp Guernsey, WY (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Wesley Vanosdall. Ryann Seifers. Rick Weathermon.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In late spring 2018, a team of anthropology students and faculty from the University of Wyoming, with support from the Wyoming Military at Camp Guernsey Training Base, recovered a historical burial from an eroding cutbank near Emigrant’s Washtub Spring. Members of the Oregon-California Trails Association marked the location based on interpretations of...


Body Histories, Historical Bodies: Adornment, Culture and Identity through Time (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Diana Loren.

This is an abstract from the "Culturing the Body: Prehistoric Perspectives on Identity and Sociality" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The body is so many things simultaneously. It is an historical object, a site of experience and violence, a set of behaviors, and is both material and metaphysical. We cannot conceive of history without bodies. Bodily adornments add further nuances that are personal, symbolic, political, situational, and...


Cajamarca: Identity through movement (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Solsiré Cusicanqui.

The Cajamarca Valley, located in the northern Andes of Peru, is a space of encounter and movement of material from different ecological areas since early times to the present. This is mainly due to its strategic location within Andean geography as an enclave of natural points of access to different ecological zones (coastal valleys, Amazon rainforest, southern highlands). Cajamarca culture (100 BC - 1400 AD) is characterized precisely by the mobility of its inhabitants, as indicated by their...


Ceramic Ecology as Deep Ecology in Northern New Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Valerie Bondura.

"This landscape is animate: it moves, transposes, builds, proceeds, shifts, always going on, never coming back, and one can only retain it in vignettes, impressions caught in a flash." —Ann Zwinger, Downcanyon We might think of ceramics as landscape "caught in a flash", a bringing together of different geological places into newly combined forms. Ecological thinking in Northern Rio Grande Pueblos frames this bringing together as a fluid gathering of forces that flow in and out of one another....


The Color of Personal Ornaments in Prehistoric Periods of the Levant (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniella Bar-Yosef Mayer.

This is an abstract from the "Culturing the Body: Prehistoric Perspectives on Identity and Sociality" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Shell beads appear first in the Middle Palaeolithic of the Levant. Their use as personal ornaments is evidence for cognitive abilities and symbolic expressions, however, their colors are limited to white, red and black. Humans’ transition from a foraging economy to agriculture in the Neolithic of the Levant brought...


Comparison by Non-Metrical Traits of Xaltocan's Shrine vs. Teotihuacan in Mexico by Using a Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling Method (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Abigail Meza-Peñaloza. Federico Zertuche.

This is an abstract from the "The Legacies of The Basin of Mexico: The Ecological Processes in the Evolution of a Civilization, Part 2" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. There is little information about the biological diversity of the populations that inhabited the Basin of Mexico. In this work we focused on showing the phenotypic differences between 118 skulls of the Xaltocan sanctuary and 44 adult skulls from Teotihuacan. It is not clear how this...


Constructing Local Identities in the Central-South Coast. The Coayllos in the Asia Valley (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ancira Emily Baca Marroquin.

Narratives regarding the response from local groups to the Inca conquest of the Peruvian Central-South coast portray two confronting scenarios: resistance and acceptation. Resistance to the Inca conquest would have required a more violent Inca military campaign meanwhile acceptance would have required specific diplomatic negotiations. Written documents describe the actions taken by the Incas when a group resisted to be conquered. These actions include removing original populations and dispersing...


Contextualizing Ritual Violence: Kinship, Ethnicity, and Human Sacrifice in Epiclassic Central Mexico (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sofía Pacheco-Forés.

This is an abstract from the "Journeying to the South, from Mimbres (New Mexico) to Malpaso (Zacatecas) and Beyond: Papers in Honor of Ben A. Nelson" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Ritual violence has a long time-depth within Mesoamerica. While archaeologists and ethnohistorians have studied the political and cosmological significance of this practice extensively, less is understood about how or why particular individuals were targeted for...


Creolization and the Zapotec Diaspora: A Classic Period Zapo-Teotihuacano Settlement in Southern Hidalgo, Mexico (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Haley Holt Mehta. Claudia Camacho. Cindy Rodriguez. Daniel Pierce. Dirk Baron.

This is an abstract from the "Crossing Boundaries: Interregional Interactions in Pre-Columbian Times" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper will present the results of a multi-faceted research endeavor at the site of El Tesoro, Hidalgo, Mexico. Previous and recent research have shown that the Classic-period settlement at El Tesoro exhibited affiliations to both Teotihuacan and the Zapotec homeland in the Valley of Oaxaca and was likely related...


Cultural Icons: Understanding Social Identity through Iconography in the Contact Era Pueblo World (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Seltzer.

The arrival of the Spanish shattered the Pueblo people’s worldview in the Rio Grande during the 16th century. Nevertheless, the Pueblo people held onto specific icons that socially identified them as Pueblo, while yet creating Spanish commissioned pottery and other Spanish materials. The 1680 Pueblo Revolt and cultural revitalization movement by Puebloan groups sought to return indigenous peoples to their heritage through an emphasis on traditional religious practices and lifeways. Using...


Death and Identity at Monte Albán (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Hansen.

Archaeologists have long striven to interpret mortuary rituals as qualitative signs of a living people--indices of sex, gender, age, status, wealth, and craft. Though the doctrine "as in life, so in death" can have some merit for archaeological inquiry, viewing mortuary ritual in this manner ignores the social act itself, which is one of the most intimate, personal, and weighted actions humans produce, serving, among other roles, to return the society to homeostasis in the wake of the loss of a...


Documenting the Archaeology of Ethnogenesis at the Lynch Site (25BD1), Nebraska (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Bamforth. Kristen Carlson.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Maize farmers settled the Lynch site in northeastern Nebraska from the late 1200s through the 1300s during a period of significant drought and social, demographic, and economic changes linked to Cahokia’s decline. Oneota groups expanded westward into the central Great Plains during this time as indigenous Central Plains Tradition farmers abandoned the western...