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Early Agriculture (Other Keyword)

1-11 (11 Records)

Archaeological Survey, Testing and Excavation On Indian and Gard Islands, Maumee Bay, Erie Twp., Monroe County, State of Michigan, During the Spring, Summer, and Fall of 1975: a Progress Report and Request for an Extension of the Previousl (1975)

Citation DOCUMENT David M. Stothers.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Archaeology without Borders: Contact, Commerce, and Change in the U.S. Southwest and Northwestern Mexico (2008)

DOCUMENT Uploaded by: Leigh Anne Ellison

Archaeology without Borders presents new research by leading U.S. and Mexican scholars and explores the impacts on archaeology of the border between the United States and Mexico. Including data previously not readily available to English-speaking readers, the twenty-four essays discuss early agricultural adaptations in the region and groundbreaking archaeological research on social identity and cultural landscapes, as well as economic and social interactions within the area now encompassed by...


The Earliest Known Occupations of the Globe Highlands in Central Arizona (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT David Doyel.

Excavations along Pinal Creek north of the Town of Miami in the Globe Highlands of central Arizona have identified a lengthy settlement history extending several thousand years from the Archaic period to the historical Apache occupation. The focus of this paper is on the earliest known periods of occupation identified by excavation. A preceramic component consisted of a structure fragment and a pit from which maize was recovered that produced a date of 790-415 B.C. E. (calibrated two-sigma),...


Early Agricultural Period Cerros de Trincheras on the Upper Gila River, Arizona (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Robert Hard. John R. Roney. A.C. MacWilliams. Mary Whisenhunt. Mark Willis.

Early Agricultural Period (EAP) occupations in the Upper Gila River in southeastern Arizona indicate that EAP cerros de trincheras are more widespread than previously thought. Recent fieldwork evaluates evidence from these sites to address issues related to chronology, agriculture, and warfare. Sites include both cerros de trincheras (hilltop sites) as well as valley sites. The site of Round Mountain contains 1.9 km of berm walls and terraces, 16 rock rings, and was built on a 640 foot hill...


The Early Agricultural Period on the Upper Gila River, Arizona (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT John Roney. Robert Hard. Karen Adams. A. C. MacWilliams. Andrea Thomas.

Recent excavation and survey documents substantial use of the Upper Gila River Valley in Arizona during the Early Agricultural period. We have identified at least two classes of Early Agricultural period sites in the Duncan region, cerros de trincheras and river terrace sites. Both contain residential architecture and evidence of a diversity of activities. Round Mountain, a cerro de trincheras, contains 1.9 km of walls and terraces and 16 rock rings and was constructed on a 640 foot hill during...


Early cultivation practices and plant domestication in New Guinea and Island Southeast Asia (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Tim Denham.

Early cultivation practices and plant domestication in the New Guinea and Island Southeast Asian regions were largely based on the vegetative propagation of a range of plant types – including root crops, shrubs, grasses and herbs – as well as the transplantation of palms, pandans and trees. The character of early agricultural practices within these regions, as well as in tropical rainforest environments elsewhere, requires different conceptual and methodological approaches than have been adopted...


Farmaging and the Limitations of Storage during the Early Agricultural Period at Las Capas (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Michael Diehl.

The charred macroplant assemblage from Las Capas yielded one domesticate (Zea mays), and forty-six wild plant taxa endemic to the greater Tucson Basin of southern Arizona. These 47 taxa, their ubiquities, and their natural ranges of occurrence, indicate that the San Pedro phase and Early Cienega phase occupants of Las Capas were primarily dependent upon wild foods. Agriculture was used to mitigate the risks of food shortfalls associated with the alternative strategy of foraging for wild food...


Humans, Fire, and Food Production: Examining the spatial and temporal patterns of changing burning practices during the transition to agriculture in the Western Mediterranean (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Grant Snitker.

One of the principle objectives of current archaeological research is to improve our understanding of the recursive relationship between humans and their environments through time. Following this objective, archaeological and paleoecological analyses have demonstrated that fire and humans have a coupled relationship in almost every biome on earth. The processes through which humans modify landscapes with fire reflect the complexities of human-environmental relationships, especially in the ...


On the Relation of Harvest Methods To Early Agriculture in the Near East (1972)

Citation DOCUMENT Vorsila L. Bohrer.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Riparian Oases and Environmental Variation during the Archaic Period in Southern Arizona, 4000 to 2000 BP (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT James Vint. Fred L. Nials.

Late Archaic forager-farmers in the Sonoran Desert lived in a resource-rich but water-poor environment. Rivers that flowed through major valleys supported lush riparian habitat, creating linear oases bounded by foothills covered by desertscrub vegetation and “sky island” mountain ranges. Hunting and foraging in these diverse ecosystems supported small but stable populations throughout the region, and by 4000 BP low-level maize agriculture was incorporated into the subsistence diet....


A Study on the Mid-to-Late Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age Agricultural Economies and their Development at Huizui Site, Yiluo Valley Region, China (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Ha Beom Kim.

In order to gain procedural understanding of early agricultural economies, researches have much to gain from in-depth, diachronic study of agricultural development in a single region. This study focuses on the changes in agricultural plant-use over time in the Yiluo Valley, North-Central China by using archaeobotanical data from the Mid-to-Late Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age occupations (c 3500 – 1500 BC) at Huizui. The study’s analysis confirms that changing plant-use patterns at Huizui...

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America