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Early cultivation practices and plant domestication in New Guinea and Island Southeast Asia

Author(s): Tim Denham

Year: 2015

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Summary

Early cultivation practices and plant domestication in the New Guinea and Island Southeast Asian regions were largely based on the vegetative propagation of a range of plant types – including root crops, shrubs, grasses and herbs – as well as the transplantation of palms, pandans and trees. The character of early agricultural practices within these regions, as well as in tropical rainforest environments elsewhere, requires different conceptual and methodological approaches than have been adopted or proposed elsewhere. This stance does not represent a descent into conceptual relativism, rather it seeks to understand the emergence of agriculture for each region of the world on its own terms.

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Early cultivation practices and plant domestication in New Guinea and Island Southeast Asia. Tim Denham. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395666)


Keywords


Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America