Escalante Ruin (Site Name Keyword)

1-7 (7 Records)

Archaeology in the Distribution Division of the Central Arizona Project: Thoughts on the History of the Hohokam Culture of Southern Arizona and on the Practice of Archaeology in the 1990s (1995)
DOCUMENT Full-Text William S. Marmaduke. Kathleen T. Henderson.

Underwritten by the Bureau of Reclamation, Northland Research archaeologists surveyed more than 7,450 hectares (18,410 acres) of southern Arizona. Two hundred four archaeological sites were recorded. Some sites, but not many, were historic in age; a few were Archaic, from the era before ceramics and sedentary agriculture in the Southwestern lowlands. The majority were from the intervening Hohokam cultural sequence. We learned from these sites that the prehistory of southern Arizona is, at one...


A Class One Overview for the Proposed San Carlos Irrigation Project Joint Works Rehabilitation
PROJECT David Doyel. USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office.

The Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office (Reclamation), undertook the development of a Water Management Plan (WMP) as part of the Central Arizona Project (CAP). In consultation with the San Carlos Irrigation Project (SCIP), the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC), and the San Carlos Irrigation and Drainage District (SCIDD), it was proposed that the Joint Works would require rehabilitation or replacement to facilitate the WMP, specifically the delivery of water to the Pima-Maricopa...


A Class One Overview for the Proposed San Carlos Irrigation Project Joint Works Rehabilitation: Report (1995)
DOCUMENT Full-Text David Doyel. Joseph S. Crary. Gina Gage. Karolyn Jackman Jensen.

The Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office (Reclamation), undertook the development of a Water Management Plan (WMP) as part of the Central Arizona Project (CAP). In consultation with the San Carlos Irrigation Project (SCIP), the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC), and the San Carlos Irrigation and Drainage District (SCIDD), it was proposed that the Joint Works would require rehabilitation or replacement to facilitate the WMP, specifically the delivery of water to the Pima-Maricopa...


The Lower Verde Archaeological Project
PROJECT Jeffrey A. Homburg. Richard Ciolek-Torrello. Jeffrey H. Altschul. Stephanie M. Whittlesey. Steven D. Shelley. USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office.

The Lower Verde Archaeological Project (LVAP) was a four-year data recovery project conducted by Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI) in the lower Verde River region of central Arizona. The project was designed to mitigate any adverse effects to cultural resources from modifications to Horseshoe and Bartlett Dams. The Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Arizona Project’s Office sponsored the research program in compliance with historic preservation legislation. The LVAP’s...


Prehistoric Villages, Castles, and Towers of Southwestern Colorado (1919)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Jesse Walter Fewkes.

A report on dozens of sites in SW Colorado and nearby Utah visited by Fewkes under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, on brief trips in 1917 and 1918.


Vanishing River Volume 4: Chapter 04: An Overview of Research History and Archaeology of Central Arizona (1997)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Stephanie M. Whittlesey.

In Chapter 4, Whittlesey presents a thorough summary of archaeological research and intellectual history in central Arizona. The author's goal is to situate the LVAP research in the context of central Arizona archaeology. Whittlesey provides histories of the research that has been conducted in the Verde drainage, the Tonto Basin, the Agua Fria drainage, and the Phoenix Basin. She concludes with a summary of the research trajectories and the different explanatory models applied to central...


Vanishing River Volume 4: Chapter 18: Research Design Revisited: Processual Issues in the Prehistory of the Lower Verde Valley (1997)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Richard Ciolek-Torrello. Stephanie M. Whittlesey.

Chapter 18 provides a summary of the LVAP’s research themes and offers an overview of the research results. Ciolek-Torello synthesizes the chronology and cultural sequence of the lower Verde Valley. He places this sequence and its cultural developments in the context of other cultural sequences in central and southern Arizona. Whittlesey then summarizes the argument for an indigenous cultural tradition in the Transition Zone of central Arizona, one with roots in Mogollon prehistory and with...