19th and 20th Century (Temporal Keyword)

1-22 (22 Records)

An Archaeological Reconnaissance Survey of a Proposed Gas Pipeline Route, Blue Grass Army Depot, Madison County, Kentucky (1998)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Henry S. McKelway. Andrew P. Bradbury. R. Berle Clay.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


An Archaeological Survey of a Proposed Coal Mine Operation Near the Community of Waverly in Union County, Kentucky (2000)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra Bybee.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


An Archaeology of Survivance: Investigating Settler Colonial Narratives with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara L Gonzalez.

Native nations in the 19th and early 20th century were subjected to increasing pressure from American settlers and the U.S. government, which resulted in their forced removal, resettlement, and the creation of policies that were directed at terminating tribal identities and reservations. Despite this history of colonial oppression and dispossession tribes such as the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon (CTGR) did not just survive settler colonialism, but created anew their social worlds and sense of...


Army Wives and Kids: Civilian Lives in Military Context at the Augusta Arsenal (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer M Trunzo. Maggie Needham.

Between 1826 and 1955, the Augusta Arsenal operated on the land currently occupied by the Summerville Campus of Augusta University. As a military site, it is easy to conceptualize the Arsenal as a male gendered place and associate it almost exclusively with war-related manufacturing activities. However, most of the artifacts recovered from the Arsenal directly address the domestic lives of the people who lived there. Additionally, many artifacts from the Arsenal speak to presence of the often...


The Beauty of Artifacts: A Study of Gendered Artifacts on a Student Led Campus Excavation (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dana Isabell Grutesen. Sarah E. Meister.

Founded in 1827, Lindenwood University was one of the few all-girl colleges of its time and was located on the American Frontier in St. Charles, Missouri. A student-led project on campus is currently analyzing artifacts from an excavation of what is believed to be a trash dump containing items from students and faculty dating back to the mid-19th century. Gendered artifacts, such as cold cream jars, are heavily represented and are a focal point of the project. Using these and other artifacts,...


Between consumption and extermination: archaeologies of modern imperialism (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alfredo González-Ruibal.

In this introduction to the session, an outline of the existing and possible archaeologies of imperialism will be sketched. Emphasis will be put on the potential of archaeology to construct alternative narratives on Western colonialism from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. It will be argued that this kind of archaeology has to take into account violence (both physical and symbolic), but also forms of hybridization, war as well as trade and exchange, open and subtle resistance, and hegemonic...


The Cape Point Maritime Cultural Landscape: Lighthouses, Shipwrecks, Baboons and Heritage Tourism in South Africa (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only B. Lynn Harris.

Since 2004, the Cape Point Nature Reserve has been part of the Cape Floral Kingdom, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The spectacular reserve has an abundance of wildlife, historic shipwrecks and a lighthouse. A shipwreck hiking trail is a popular feature. Heritage visitation combined with nature tourism is a key component in South African economic growth today.  The Cape Point area is a good example of showcasing a global maritime cultural landscape in a broader context and this study explores the...


Chapter 9: Clear-Cutting, Reforestation, and the Coming of the Interstate: Vermont’s Photographic Record of Landscape Use and Response (2010)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Paul Bierman.

In this chapter, we use both original and repeat images of Vermont to document how the landscape has responded to human actions that include deforestation, reforestation, and road building. We use three examples to demonstrate how repeat photography of the same site at different times can be used to document—both qualitatively and quantitatively— landscape response to human actions with the thought that, by examining past landscape responses, we can better inform future land-use decisions. The...


Coopers, Peddlers, and Bricklayers: Stories of a Working-Class Property through Public Archaeology in Washington, DC (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only L. Chardé Reid. Julianna Jackson. John M Hyche. Lyle Torp. Charles H Leedecker.

An archaeological investigation of a lot where a former frame shotgun house once stood offers a unique look at 19th century working-class immigrant households. A German immigrant carpenter built the house before 1853 and it was successively occupied by a peddler, cooper, and bricklayer; little is known about their lives. Prior to redevelopment, the DC HPO Archaeology Program conducted a systematic archaeological survey from August 2016 to May 2017, the "Shotgun House Public Archaeology Project"....


Domestic Labor in Black and Green: Deciphering the Shared experiences of African American and Irish Domestics Working in the same Northern Virginia Households and Communities (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Furlong.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries wealthy American households relied on domestic labor for the running of the home. In the Northeast, this labor was provided by European immigrants, who often moved from job to job seeking better opportunities. While in the South, African Americans continued to perform the same work many had performed under slavery, often staying in the same geographical region as their family and former owners.  In Northern Virginia, these two forms of domestic labor...


Guidelines for Creating a Typology for Mass-Produced 19th and 20th Century Burial Container Hardware (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Jeremy Pye.

The analysis and historical study of burial container hardware and other mortuary artifacts is crucial in establishing a useful discourse between the multiple lines of evidence recorded and recovered in historical cemetery investigations. Exact identification of types and styles of burial container hardware is vital in defining the chronology of burial, which is necessary in situations where grave markers have been lost or moved from their original locations. In addition, variations in hardware...


Immigration and Transformation in Central California: A Case Study from the Samuel Adams Limekiln Complex, Santa Cruz County, California (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David G. Hyde.

The mid- to late-nineteenth century in California was marked by rapid and dramatic technological, economic, and social change. These transformations were spurred largely by the substantial influx of multiple diasporic communities from across the globe, being both pushed and pulled to the state by various factors. As a result, from their origin, many industries, places, and communities were multi-ethnic, with internal social and labor divisions being based on complex, fluid, and historically...


Incorporating Laborers: Saunas in Industrial Finland (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Timo Ylimaunu. Paul R. Mullins. Tiina Äikäs. Titta Kallio-Seppä.

Since the late 19th century most Finnish industrial areas have had one distinctive and important building—sauna—that was as important to workers as to the company’s officials. Industrial spaces had usually separated workers’ housing areas and many cases saunas were separately located from the housing and industrial spaces; most likely because of the danger of fire. We will discuss the importance and role of saunas for the industrial communities in Finland. In some industrial areas workers had...


Is Close Enough, Enough?: Negotiations of Self and Place in Castroville, Texas through Ceramics. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hunter Crosby. Erin Whitson.

The mid-to-late-19th century marked a time of enormous material and social changearound the world. Newly available lands and a more fluid social structure made life in the American West, and Texas, especially desirable for immigrants from Europe. Immigrants from the French-German border region of Alsace sought and found opportunity in what would become Castroville, Texas. The Birys, a family within the community, sought opportunity like many new immigrants and faced many of the same challenges....


Oil and Shipwrecks: An Overview Of Sites Selected For The Deepwater Shipwrecks And Oil Spill Impacts Project (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel J Warren. Robert A Church. Robert Westrick.

In 2013 and 2014, C & C Technologies, Inc. joined the multidisciplinary team studying the impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on deepwater shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico.  C&C’s primary objective is the archaeological analysis of the selected shipwreck sites for the project.  The project shipwrecks include 19th Century wooden hull vessels and 20th Century metal-hull vessels, ranging in water depth from 470 to 4,890 feet below sea level .  This paper will discuss the wreck selection...


Phase I Archaeological Investigation of the Proposed Right-Of-Way of KY 57 at Sleepy Run Creek, Fleming County, Kentucky (1995)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James P. Fenton. Karen E. Hudson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Phase II Archaeological Testing Sites 18AN366 and 18AN778, Improvements to Runway 10 / 28, Baltimore / Washington International Airport (1993)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Terry H. Klein. Robert D. Wall. Marvin A. Brown.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


The Price of Death: Materiality and Economy of 19th and 20th Century Funeral Wakes on the Periphery of Western Ireland. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara Morrow. Ian Kuijt.

What is the price of death?  Funeral wakes, at the intersection of religion, community, and material consumption, are one way to consider the connotation of marginal communities as representing national and local traditions and historic identity. The coastal islands of rural western Ireland have historically been presented as culturally isolated, economically disadvantaged, and geographically inaccessible. In the Western region, religious and local traditions surrounding death have been...


Remembering and Forgetting: Civil War Prisoner of War Camp Cemeteries in the North (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sherene Baugher.

Andersonville is a familiar name to Americans because of the effective way both the POW camp and the cemetery are memorialized as National Heritage Sites.  But what were the conditions in the Northern POW camps for Confederate prisoners?  The Elmira, New York Prisoner of War Camp was the Andersonville of the north.  This site, like other Northern POW camps, was dismantled after the war. What was the fate of the Northern POW camp cemeteries? Were there monuments to the Confederate dead? Did any...


Routes Of Removal: Vessel Biographies And The Island Transfer Of Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Peoples, Queensland, Australia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Madeline E Fowler.

Removal—the forcible movement of a person to a church or state-run institution, brought about or sanctioned by the state (often through the use of race-based legislation)—affected every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community in the state of Queensland in the 19th and 20th century. With many missions, stations and reserves located on islands, the watercraft engaged in removals are often implicit in the historical archives. Targeted research of these vessels including use and function;...


Sharing the Buried History of the Apperson Community, Menifee County, Kentucky (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kim A. McBride. Wayna L Adams.

This is an abstract from the "Communicating Working Class Heritage in the 21st Century: Values, Lessons, Methods, and Meanings" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. About 1941-1943, as the Cumberland (now Daniel Boone) National Forest, was forming, the occupants of two rural domestic sites in Menifee County, Kentucky left, most eventually to find work in factories of Ohio and Michigan.   Recent historical and archaeological study of these sites has...


Washington's Board of Public Works and the Burial of Herring Hill in Georgetown, District of Columbia (An Archaeology of Municipal Infrastructure). (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Palus.

A dramatic investment in the infrastructure of Georgetown followed the establishment of a single municipal government for the City of Washington in 1871, and the abolishment of Georgetown’s charter as an independent municipality. Establishing new street grades in this context resulted in the near-burial of homes in an African-American section of Georgetown called Herring Hill, which became an unofficial dump for fill excavated during infrastructure work. Beginning in February 2011, The District...