Coopers, Peddlers, and Bricklayers: Stories of a Working-Class Property through Public Archaeology in Washington, DC

Summary

An archaeological investigation of a lot where a former frame shotgun house once stood offers a unique look at 19th century working-class immigrant households. A German immigrant carpenter built the house before 1853 and it was successively occupied by a peddler, cooper, and bricklayer; little is known about their lives. Prior to redevelopment, the DC HPO Archaeology Program conducted a systematic archaeological survey from August 2016 to May 2017, the "Shotgun House Public Archaeology Project".  Volunteers helped uncover features and a wealth of material culture related to multiple generations of these immigrant households, including an artifact-rich midden and cellar. Public outreach and education were key components for engaging the public with the past. Hands-on learning, site tours, fence talks, local news media, and Facebook posts have resulted in an outpouring of support from the economically, socially, and racially diverse neighborhood – a microcosm of the city as a whole.

Cite this Record

Coopers, Peddlers, and Bricklayers: Stories of a Working-Class Property through Public Archaeology in Washington, DC. L. Chardé Reid, Julianna Jackson, John M Hyche, Lyle Torp, Charles H Leedecker. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441725)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 974