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A PHYTOLITH AND STARCH RECORD OF FOOD AND GRIT IN MAYAN HUMAN TOOTH TARTAR

Author(s): Linda Scott Cummings ; Ann Magennis

Year: 1997

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Summary

Diet often is reconstructed based on indirect evidence. Tooth tartar traps food particles, preserving a record of food consumed. Dental calculus removed from primary and secondary burials at Kichpanha was examined to identify imbedded phytoliths, starch granules, and debris as indicators of diet. The purpose of this study is to determine whether phytoliths and starch granules are preserved and recoverable from human dental calculus, to establish appropriate methods for this recovery and to identify specific plants consumed. Kichpanha is a lowland Mayan site in north central Belize. This small, peripheral site was occupied from the Preclassic to the Early Postclassic (900 BC - 900 AD).


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Cite this Record

A PHYTOLITH AND STARCH RECORD OF FOOD AND GRIT IN MAYAN HUMAN TOOTH TARTAR. Linda Scott Cummings, Ann Magennis. In The State-of-the-Art of Phytoliths in Soils and Plants. Madrid: Monografias del Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales. 1997 ( tDAR id: 380544) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8V987PC


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -89.231; min lat: 15.882 ; max long: -88.044; max lat: 18.5 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): PaleoResearch Institute


Record Identifiers

PRI Technical Contract(s): 95-093

File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
95-93.pdf 834.76kb Dec 27, 2012 11:23:11 AM Public
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America