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Prehistoric Subsistence Adaptation in the Upper Great Lakes: A Perspective from Butternut-Franklin Lakes

Author(s): Kathryn Egan-Bruhy ; Mark Bruhy

Year: 2015

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Summary

The Butternut-Franklin Lakes Archaeological District is located immediately south of the confluence of the Upper Wisconsin, Menominee, Brule River watersheds, in an area dominated by several thousand lakes. The preponderance of streams, swamps, and marshes make this a vast and extraordinary aquatic ecosystem. Archaeological research in this region, extending back into the 1960s, provides a solid baseline for reconstruction of the dynamic settlement/subsistence adaptation of prehistoric populations in this region from the Archaic through the Oneota tradition.

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Prehistoric Subsistence Adaptation in the Upper Great Lakes: A Perspective from Butternut-Franklin Lakes. Kathryn Egan-Bruhy, Mark Bruhy. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 394932)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -104.634; min lat: 36.739 ; max long: -80.64; max lat: 49.153 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America