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The Art of Footwear, Footwear as Art: Thirteen Hundred Years of Twined Sandal Production in the Northern Southwest

Author(s): Laurie Webster

Year: 2015

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Summary

Finely woven yucca cordage sandals appeared in the northern Southwest 2000 years ago as a fully formed craft tradition and continued in use until the early A.D. 1200s. Their complex, labor-intensive weave structures, ornate toe finishes, and elaborate iconography suggest that these sandals played important social and symbolic roles in communities of the San Juan region for more than a millennium before disappearing from the archaeological record in the mid-thirteenth century. In this diachronic synthesis, I explore changes in the form, technology, and use contexts of these sandals and changing roles of this elaborate footwear in the ancient northern Southwest.

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The Art of Footwear, Footwear as Art: Thirteen Hundred Years of Twined Sandal Production in the Northern Southwest. Laurie Webster. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 396224)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
North America - Southwest


Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America