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Power before Paquimé? Hypotheses on Political Economies in Casas Grandes.

Author(s): Jerimy Cunningham

Year: 2015

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Summary

In this paper, I outline alternative hypotheses on the nature of the late-Viejo and early-Medio Period political economies in the Casas Grandes Regional System from what is now Chihuahua, Mexico. Recent research has described in impressive detail the productive base and the ideology that may have emerged at Paquimé during its late-Medio Period (AD 1350-1450) florescence. However, little is known about power in the Casas Grandes region either prior to Paquimé’s brief 14th Century expansion into a primate center or outside of its immediate hinterland. Drawing on recent research from the Santa Clara Valley, I offer some alternative hypotheses for the political economies of the late-Viejo and early-Medio Periods. I emphasize the role that ritual performance may have had in local modes of production and consider its implications for the emergence of inequality in the Casas Grandes Regional System.

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Power before Paquimé? Hypotheses on Political Economies in Casas Grandes.. Jerimy Cunningham. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 396639)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America