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Not All Archaeology for the Public is Public Archaeology

Author(s): Dante Angelo

Year: 2015

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Summary

The concept of public archaeology has become ubiquitous since the last decade and, gradually, it seems to have been accepted as an important component of archaeological research. However, despite the wider popularization of the concept, its operationalization still poses challenges to archaeologists interested in surpassing the academic and professional sphere. Here, I reflect on the procedural guidelines and implications that public archaeology has recently attained and some of the challenges they raise considering study cases in northern Chile. My aims in this presentation are twofold: first, to briefly sketch some of the scenarios in which this concept is commonly thought of or applied to in northern Chile; and, second, to explore the use public archaeology as a tool to approach the dynamics embedded in the relationships between past and present.

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Not All Archaeology for the Public is Public Archaeology. Dante Angelo. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 397353)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America