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The Butana Group in Comparison with the Predynastic and Late Neolithic Groups in the Nile Valley and Adjacent Areas of the Sahel and Sahara: A Look at How Ceramics Can be Used to Differentiate Socioeconomic, Ethnic, and Political Differences

Author(s): Frank Winchell

Year: 2015

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Summary

Various ceramic-bearing groups occupied and settled in the Nile Valley during the end of the 5th millennium BC and through the 4th millennium BC, ranging from hunter-gatherers, agro-pastoralists, agriculturalists, and finally to state level societies. Some of these groups appear to have been involved with intergroup trade and cooperation at various levels, while others were not. This paper will look into the characteristic traits associated with these groups in northeast Africa and how their corresponding ceramic assemblages can tell much about their origins, way of life, social and ethnic orientations, and how they interacted with each other and with other societies outside the region.

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The Butana Group in Comparison with the Predynastic and Late Neolithic Groups in the Nile Valley and Adjacent Areas of the Sahel and Sahara: A Look at How Ceramics Can be Used to Differentiate Socioeconomic, Ethnic, and Political Differences. Frank Winchell. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 397525)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -18.809; min lat: -38.823 ; max long: 53.262; max lat: 38.823 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America