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The complete genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from Eurasia

Author(s): Qiaomei Fu

Year: 2015

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Summary

We have sequenced to high coverage the genome of a femur recently discovered near Ust-Ishim in western Siberia. The bone was directly carbon-dated to 45,000 years before present. Analyses of the relationship of the Ust-Ishim individual to present-day humans show that he is closely related to the ancestral population shared between present-day Europeans and present-day Asians. The over-all amount of genomic admixture from Neandertals is similar to that in present-day non-Africans and there is no evidence for admixture from Denisovans. However, the size of the genomic segments of Neandertal ancestry in the Ust-Ishim individual is substantially larger than in present-day individuals. From the size distribution of these segments we estimated that this individual lived about 200-400 generations after the admixture with Neandertals occurred. The age of this genome allows us to directly assess the mutation rate in the different compartments of the human genome. These results will be presented and discussed.

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The complete genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from Eurasia. Qiaomei Fu. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 398147)


Keywords


Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America