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Think Small: What charcoal fragments and tiny sites teach us about indigenous land modifications and farming around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

Author(s): Pierre Morenon

Year: 2015

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Summary

Are eye-witness descriptions in 1524 of extensive farming and intensive habitat modifications around Narragansett Bay by indigenous people just fantasies? Pollen evidence in now urban industrial Rhode Island remains unconvincing. To date, less than a dozen pre-Contact Rhode Island sites containing Zea maize have been found. This paper examines ongoing experiments with charcoal, particularly from RI 1898 – a tiny intact spot with a remarkably preserved stone tool manufacturing assemblage on the coastal edge – to evaluate broad questions about changing indigenous land use, deforestation and farming in a New England coastal setting.

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Think Small: What charcoal fragments and tiny sites teach us about indigenous land modifications and farming around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.. Pierre Morenon. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 398233)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -80.815; min lat: 39.3 ; max long: -66.753; max lat: 47.398 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America