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Subsistence, Environment, and Ceramic Technological Variability at Puerto Hormiga and Monsú, Early Pottery Sites of the Caribbean Colombia

Author(s): Fumie Iizuka ; Diana Carvajal Contreras

Year: 2016

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Summary

Archaic to Formative transitions in the Intermediate Area of Latin America have been discussed in terms of the timing of agriculture, population growth, sedentism and mobility, use of coastal resources, and the appearance of pottery. The Caribbean Colombia has among the earliest dates for pottery in the New World. Sites such as Puerto Chacho and Puerto Hormiga, shell middens near the coast, were occupied by ca. 5,000 B.P., during the wet period. Monsú, a mound in the riverine environment, was in use by ca. 4250 B.P., during the dry period. Faunal-based subsistence practices differed at these sites. Technologically, whereas pottery from Puerto Hormiga has fiber temper and sand inclusions, that of Monsú has shell temper and sand inclusions. Degrees of residential mobility and reliance on cultigens have been debated. In this presentation, we focus on Puerto Hormiga and Monsú that were recently re-excavated, evaluating the inter-site and intra-site diachronic relations of subsistence practice, environment, and ceramic technology. We investigated the variability of their pottery technology and their faunal assemblages, and compared them with results from existing lithic and paleoethnobotanical studies. This research provides new insights on the behavior and change at the early ceramic sites of the Caribbean coast of Colombia.


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Subsistence, Environment, and Ceramic Technological Variability at Puerto Hormiga and Monsú, Early Pottery Sites of the Caribbean Colombia. Fumie Iizuka, Diana Carvajal Contreras. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 403059)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -90.747; min lat: 3.25 ; max long: -48.999; max lat: 27.683 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America