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Coastal development and palaeoenvironment on the north coast of Papua New Guinea: the Paniri Creek sequence

Author(s): Mark Golitko ; Ethan Cochrance ; James Goff

Year: 2016

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Summary

Pleistocene-Holocene environmental variance in the southwestern Pacific plays a critical role in explaining the human settlement potential of islands, and their respective settlement histories. In particular, prevalence of viable ecological niches for human settlement on the northern coast of New Guinea has likely fluctuated due to a combination of eustatic and tectonic factors that may have constrained the size of human populations living there as well as its potential as a route of movement between ISEA and the remote Pacific islands at times. We examine a long-term record of coastal development at Paniri Creek, a location now 14km inland from which near-coastal deposits and human remains were recovered during the 1920s. Our new analysis of the Paniri sequence indicates a complex sequence of environmental change spanning the late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene, including potential palaeo-shore deposits. Implications of observed changes in coastal morphology and environment are discussed in relation to the regional archaeological record as currently understood.


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Coastal development and palaeoenvironment on the north coast of Papua New Guinea: the Paniri Creek sequence. Mark Golitko, Ethan Cochrance, James Goff. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 403146)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: 111.973; min lat: -52.052 ; max long: -87.715; max lat: 53.331 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America