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Shamanistic Rock Art Motifs: Dynamic and Emplaced Performances of the Sacred among the Ojibway

Author(s): Alex Ruuska

Year: 2016

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Summary

The Ojibway on the northern and southern shores of Lake Superior of North America created transitory as well as relatively permanent material expressions of sacred experiences and cultural narratives. Using examples of 'spirit objects' expressed via emplaced pictographs in the landscape in Ontario Canada and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, Mide’wiwin birch bark scrolls, and culturally modified ‘storied’ trees, this paper compares and contrasts dynamic and emplaced expressions of the sacred, and the interplay between the two. In process, I explore the role of 'spirit objects' in marking places, promoting a sense of the cultural past, emplacement and displacement, and “ancestral memory.”


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Cite this Record

Shamanistic Rock Art Motifs: Dynamic and Emplaced Performances of the Sacred among the Ojibway. Alex Ruuska. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 403484)


Keywords

General
Ojibway Ritual Rock Art

Geographic Keywords
North America-Canada


Spatial Coverage

min long: -142.471; min lat: 42.033 ; max long: -47.725; max lat: 74.402 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America