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Moving the Animal: Camelid Herding on the North Coast of Peru and the Temporalities of Human-Animal Interactions during the Moche Period

Author(s): Aleksa Alaica

Year: 2016

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Summary

The north coast of Peru during the Middle Horizon Period witnessed a shift in the way that people, things and animals moved across the landscape. The often fragmented polities that formed the occupation sites for communities engaged in Moche ideology and politics were also associated with trade and interregional interaction on a different scale. The role of animals in this exchange is often overlooked and taken for granted. Camelids (alpacas and llamas) were the conduits of mobility within the highlands and on the coast of Peru with skeletal evidence revealing the intensity of caravan trading. If we consider the amount of time dedicated to the exchange of things, ideas, languages and even the movement of entire communities, animals, in particular camelids, where present for each of these processes. The reorganization of temporalities that surrounded camelids not only reordered the lives of how these animals were used but it also restructured the way that human communities engaged with the landscape, with each other and how the notion of value was altered by the use of animals. This paper will argue that the intensified use of animals as a means of mobility ignited a recapitulation of communities, politics and self.


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Moving the Animal: Camelid Herding on the North Coast of Peru and the Temporalities of Human-Animal Interactions during the Moche Period. Aleksa Alaica. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404121)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America