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Scioto Hopewell Concepts of Soul-Like Essences in Humans: Mortuary Evidence in Light of Historic Woodland and Plains Native American Concepts

Author(s): Heather Smyth ; Christopher Carr

Year: 2016

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Summary

Scioto Hopewell conceptions of soul-like essences in humans are evident in the systematic placements of grave goods of particular kinds at particular bodily locations of inhumations, and with insights from comparative information on historic Woodland and Plains Native Americans. Analysis of 284 burials from 11 Scioto Hopewell cemeteries indicates a recognition of one "free" journeying soul and multiple "body" souls; their bodily residences, locations of exit upon death, and likely directions taken; differing functions of different souls; and different "medicines" placed with different souls. Whether souls of individuals of different ages, sexes, and communities were thought to vary is explored.


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Scioto Hopewell Concepts of Soul-Like Essences in Humans: Mortuary Evidence in Light of Historic Woodland and Plains Native American Concepts. Heather Smyth, Christopher Carr. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404508)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -104.634; min lat: 36.739 ; max long: -80.64; max lat: 49.153 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America