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Genetic structure of ancient population of the Early Bronze Age Qijia Culture and genetic contribution present-day Chinese

Author(s): Zeng Wen ; Yongsheng Zhao ; Hong Zhu ; Jiawei Li

Year: 2016

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Summary

The Qijia culture was an early Bronze Age culture distributed around the upper Yellow River region of Gansu (centered in Lanzhou) and eastern Qinghai, China. It is regarded as one of the earliest bronze cultures. The Mogou site was a massive site of Qijia Culture in the Ganging region, more than one thousand graves have been found there. In our research, we studied the genetic structure of early ancient Mogou population, and further explored the genetic relationship between them and present-day Chinese people.We successfully analyzed and repeated 55 of 60 samples from Mogou site. Their mitochondrial DNA haplotypes were assigned to 14 haplogroups: A, B, C, D (D*, D4, D5), F, G, M7, M8, M10, M13, M25, and N*, N9a, Z. Y-SNP analysis revealed that 6 individuals which were successfully identified by molecular biology all belonged to haplogroup O3a3. We found that the ancient Mogou population living in Ganqing region have significant genetic contributions to present-day Tibeto-Burman populations and North Han Chinese population.


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Genetic structure of ancient population of the Early Bronze Age Qijia Culture and genetic contribution present-day Chinese. Zeng Wen, Yongsheng Zhao, Hong Zhu, Jiawei Li. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404655)


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min long: 66.885; min lat: -8.928 ; max long: 147.568; max lat: 54.059 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America