The circulation of college crockery in Cambridge, England, c.1760-1950: an urban archaeological tracer dye?

Author(s): Craig Cessford

Year: 2013

Summary

From c. 1760 onwards the colleges and other component elements of the University of Cambridge, England, regularly used ceramics marked with the names of colleges and the cooks who worked for them. We know with absolute certainty where many of these ceramics were principally employed, during dining in the hall of the college. This information, combined with their known depositional contexts, allows us to consider such ceramics as a form of archaeological ‘tracer dye’, whereby the circulation of material culture between different spatial, temporal and social contexts in mid 18th to mid 20th century Cambridge can be modelled and patterns recognised. When this is extended to groups of material rather than individual artefacts, it creates powerful ‘assemblage biographies’ which have a materialised temporality that reveals much about how the urban archaeological record is formed and the individuals, households and other groups that created these assemblages.

Cite this Record

The circulation of college crockery in Cambridge, England, c.1760-1950: an urban archaeological tracer dye?. Craig Cessford. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428238)

Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 117