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Exotic consumption: the character and changes in significance of Chinese porcelain used in 18th-century Copenhagen.

Author(s): Rikke Søndergaard Kristensen

Year: 2013

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Summary

The Danish Asiatic Company was founded in Copenhagen in 1732. Direct trade with China was now possible and Copenhageners gained easier access to exotic goods.

The Copenhageners could now see themselves as part of a globalized network of metropoles.  In their daily life, Copenhageners were able to express familiarity with other cultures and thus express a new kind of knowledge and status. How broadly did this fascination with exotic cultures extend within the population? New investigations indicate that a larger part of the population in 18th century Copenhagen used Chinese porcelain than previously thought.

Chinese porcelain can be seen as a mediator of Chinese and European cultural exchange. Porcelain expresses cultural interactions within a trade system that generally lacked cultural contact; it underwent a transformation from being a Chinese ware, to becoming a more hybrid, sometimes a purely European, ware – that for practical reasons was made in China.


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Cite this Record

Exotic consumption: the character and changes in significance of Chinese porcelain used in 18th-century Copenhagen.. Rikke Søndergaard Kristensen. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428239)


Keywords

General
Consumption context Trade

Geographic Keywords
Denmark Western Europe

Temporal Keywords
18th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: 8.093; min lat: 54.562 ; max long: 15.138; max lat: 57.736 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 254

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America