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Making a New World Together: The Atlantic World, Afrocentrism, and Negotiated Freedoms between Enslaver and Enslaved at Kingsley Plantation (Fort George Island, Florida), 1814-1839. 

Author(s): James Davidson

Year: 2013

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Summary

Zephaniah Kingsley, a British planter and slave trader living in Spanish Florida, was married to Anta Madgigine Jai, an African Senegambian woman, with whom he had four biracial children.  Kingsley, in the context of his own time and given his personal history was decidedly Afrocentric in his later life, remorseful at the end of his life for his past actions as slave trader and owner, and certainly sympathetic to Africans, both enslaved and free, as individuals and to their collective heritage.   After examining the results of seven years of summer field schools, and reassessing the pioneering 1968 excavations of the Kingsley slave cabins by Dr. Charles Fairbanks, there is strong evidence for continuities and possible innovation of traditional African belief and secular lifeways, and more broadly, the interplay between African and British worlds and cosmologies, and between enslaver (both African and British) and enslaved over time


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Cite this Record

Making a New World Together: The Atlantic World, Afrocentrism, and Negotiated Freedoms between Enslaver and Enslaved at Kingsley Plantation (Fort George Island, Florida), 1814-1839. . James Davidson. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428247)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 381

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America