Real Pirates of the Caribbean: Archaeological Interpretation of Captain Kidd and Captain Morgan’s Shipwrecks

Author(s): Frederick Hanselmann

Year: 2013

Summary

Pirates have long captured our collective imaginations, yet very little concrete evidence has been observed in the archaeological record.  In recent years, a number of projects have studied and searched for the remains of ships that belonged to some of history’s most infamous pirates, including Captain William Kidd and Captain Henry Morgan.  As these ships were part of the budding globalization during  the 17th century, the subsequent interpretation of these sites includes placing them in the context of world systems analysis in order to provide a framework for understanding their linkages across political, societal, and geographic boundaries.  Additionally, common pool resource theory is applied to notions of access, management, and preservation, as these sites have become very important to the respective nations in whose waters they lie. 

Cite this Record

Real Pirates of the Caribbean: Archaeological Interpretation of Captain Kidd and Captain Morgan’s Shipwrecks. Frederick Hanselmann. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428296)

Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 367