Investigating the Intersection of Chinese and Euro-American Healthcare Practices in Nevada from 1860-1930

Author(s): Sarah Heffner

Year: 2013

Summary

This paper discusses the exchange of healthcare practices between Overseas Chinese and Euro-Americans in Nevada from 1860-1930. Analysis of medicinal artifacts from seven archaeological sites in Nevada yielded evidence of Chinese consumption of Euro-American patent medicines and Euro-American use of Chinese medicines. A number of different factors may have influenced the decision of Chinese individuals to purchase and consume Euro-American medicines. These include discrimination from public hospitals and by Euro-American doctors, convenience and affordability, lack of access to traditional doctors, and alcohol content of patent medicines. Euro-Americans chose to use Chinese medicine and visit Chinese doctors as an alternative to harsh, mineral-based regimens prescribed by allopathic physicians. Chinese doctors were particularly adept at treating infectious and epidemic diseases, blood poisoning, venereal diseases, and psychological disorders. Additionally, medicinal artifacts located in Nevada archaeological collections revealed information on diseases and ailments of the mining West.

Cite this Record

Investigating the Intersection of Chinese and Euro-American Healthcare Practices in Nevada from 1860-1930. Sarah Heffner. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428432)

Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 525