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Stinking foreshore to tree lined avenue: Investigating the riverine lives impacted by the construction of the Thames Embankments in Victorian London.

Author(s): Hanna Steyne

Year: 2013

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Summary

Victorian London saw dramatic changes along the Thames, with the construction of the East End Docks and Thames Embankments, as the city struggled to cope with its ballooning population and prospering shipping industry.

The Embankments reclaimed a stinking, effluent covered foreshore previously occupied by wharves, jetties, barge beds and slips, and contained a new sewer system and covered railways, finished with tree lined avenues and road access to central London.

The Embankment has been hailed as an engineering triumph; however the fate of the wharf workers, barge, ferry and lighter men and others whose livelihood relied on access to the river in central London is unknown. This research aims to combine archaeological surveys and historical research to characterise the working environment of riverine London in the mid to late 19th century and to investigate the stories of those whose lives were most impacted by this dramatic riverfront transformation.


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Cite this Record

Stinking foreshore to tree lined avenue: Investigating the riverine lives impacted by the construction of the Thames Embankments in Victorian London.. Hanna Steyne. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428436)


Keywords

General
london Thames Victorian

Geographic Keywords
United Kingdom Western Europe


Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 164

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America