Negotiating the transformation of a workspace into a classroom and museum at James Madison's Montpelier

Author(s): Katherine E Seeber

Year: 2013

Summary

James Madison’s Montpelier is the plantation home of the forth president of the United States, and author of the U.S. Constitution. The historic home is located in the Piedmont Region of Virginia, and has had an archaeology program since 1985. Throughout the years, like any department it underwent a multitude of changes from the beginning to present. However, for the last several years we have employed a vigorous public archaeology program educating all ranges of people from archaeology students, to retired adults, and families. This paper shall address the positive and negative consequences that are inevitably hatched when a program such as our must transform our workspaces (primarily the laboratory) continuously from full-scale archaeology lab, to classroom, to museum space and back again. 

Cite this Record

Negotiating the transformation of a workspace into a classroom and museum at James Madison's Montpelier. Katherine E Seeber. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428745)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 468