tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Interpreting Race in Public: Collaborations Between Historical Archaeologists and Public Historians

Author(s): Modupe Labode

Year: 2015

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Public historians and historical archaeologists often share goals of communicating knowledge about the past with the non-specialist public.  However, public historians and historical archaeologists rarely collaborate or communicate with one another about their approaches to stakeholders and the past. To indicate how such collaborations enhance public interpretations of history, I will first briefly describe my experiences, as a public historian, of working with historical archaeologists on projects interpreting Native American and African American history. I will then discuss practical, institutional, and disciplinary factors that facilitate or constrain such collaboration. My presentation will conclude with my observations about how these interdisciplinary collaborations complicate and enrich public interpretations of race and have the potential to counter racially-biased narratives.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Interpreting Race in Public: Collaborations Between Historical Archaeologists and Public Historians. Modupe Labode. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433837)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 289

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America