Engendered Death: A Comprehensive Analysis of Identity in the Mission System of 17th Century Spanish Florida

Author(s): Katherine L Brewer

Year: 2015

Summary

Personal identity, while always fluid, was especially so in the borderlands that made up seventeenth-century Spanish Florida due to the collision of many different cultures within the colonial system. The Spanish missions set up by the Franciscans who travelled to the frontier of Spanish territory in Florida served as places wherein the Apalachee, the Guale, and the Timucua could negotiate issues of identity such as gender, social status, and age. Analysis of cemetery populations excavated from several of those missions has provided insights into the results of this negotiation. The methods utilized, if replicated elsewhere, could reveal identity formation strategies in other areas, not only in other Spanish colonial contexts but other colonial settings, both European and non-European, as well.

Cite this Record

Engendered Death: A Comprehensive Analysis of Identity in the Mission System of 17th Century Spanish Florida. Katherine L Brewer. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434056)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
17th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 465