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Expanding KOCOA’s Potential: The Role of a West Point Military Academy Education on the Second Seminole War Florida (1835-1842)

Author(s): Michelle D. Sivilich

Year: 2015

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Summary

The field of conflict archaeology has begun embracing KOCOA as a regular part of battlefield analysis. However, I argue KOCOA can be further expanded to include indirect expressions of warfare and incorporate them into a meaningful discussion of their role in the outcome of conflict. To accomplish this, I develop a model that allows for the investigation of hypotheses about decision-making processes and their effectiveness using the Second Seminole War (1835-1842) in Florida as a case study. In the early nineteenth century, the military as a cultural institution indoctrinated cadets through extensive training at the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. I propose this standardized education had a significant effect on the shape, direction, and outcome of the conflict. There was an educational discontinuity between the knowledge gained through training and the knowledge needed in the field when it came to the swamps and hammocks of Florida. 


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Expanding KOCOA’s Potential: The Role of a West Point Military Academy Education on the Second Seminole War Florida (1835-1842). Michelle D. Sivilich. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434082)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1835-1842


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 522

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America